Institute of Management Services 75th Anniversary

Management Services, Spring 2016 | Go to article overview

Institute of Management Services 75th Anniversary


The year 2016 is an important milestone in the life of the Institute of Management Services (IMS), as it marks the 75th anniversary of the formation of the Institute in 1941.

The IMS as it presently exists can directly trace its history back to the first British professional body concerned wholly with productivity, which was established in 1941 as the Institute of Estimators, Planning and Time Study Engineers.

In June 1942, Council decided to change the name of the Institute to the Institute of Economic Engineering. After the war years the Institute drew up an examination syllabus and issued the first of its monthly journals in April 1945, as well as publishing a standard text entitled Time Study and Rate Fixing.

During 1946, the Production Control Research Group merged with the Institute. In May 1953, the Institute changed its name to the Society of Industrial Engineers. In fact, the early years of the Institute saw a number of mergers with similar professional bodies.

In parallel, the Work Study Society was formed in 1943, but in March 1944 the Society changed its name to the Motion Study Society, and in April of the following year, they expanded this by calling it the Motion Study Society of Great Britain. By March 1954, it had changed its name to the Work Study Society.

In October 1956, the Society of Industrial Engineers and the Work Study Society issued their first monthly combined journal Work Study and Industrial Engineering. March 1958 saw both societies merge under the title of the Work Study Society. In May of the following year, the Society again changed its name to the Institute of Work Study and in 1961 invested Russell Currie as its first president.

May 1963 saw the Institute of Work Study start negotiations for a merger with the Institute of Incorporated Work Study Technologists. This Institute had begun life in April 1945 as the Institute of Industrial Technicians with a new journal, The Time Study Engineer. Again, as a qualifying body, the Institute prepared an examination syllabus and in November 1947 the first examination was held. In July 1960 this Institute changed its name to the Institute of Incorporated Work Study Technologists.

As a result of talks, both Institutes decided to merge into the Institute of Work Study Practitioners on 23 December 1964.

In 1962 the Organisation and Methods Society was formed and throughout its development this new society worked closely with the Institute of Work Study Practitioners. In 1975 both bodies merged to form the Institute of Practitioners in Work Study, Organisation and Methods. Apart from its length, it was evident that the title of the new Institute did not fully describe the considerably diverse interests of its members, and on 1 November 1978 the Institute again changed its name to the Institute of Management Services.

At long last, after so many changes and mergers, the resultant Institute now had a name which properly described its function and purpose. This name has now been in use for over 38 years and the Institute of Management Services has become one of the world's major professional bodies dedicated to improving productivity. Lord Thurso is currently the Institute's President.

Among our former Presidents we have been honoured by:

Lord Beeching (1 967-1 972)

HRH The Duke of Edinburgh (1972-1976)

Sir Monty Finniston (1 976-1 982)

The Lord Chilver of Cranfield (1 983-2001)

Lord Thurso 2001 - present

The history of the Institute's Journal

The Present Institute of Management Services (IMS) Journal Management Services can trace its history back 59 years to the issue of Volume 11957 Work Study & Industrial Engineering the official Journal of the Society of Industrial Engineers and the Work Study Society.

The present IMS Journal is quite unlike the first publication in 1957, in size, appearance, quality of paper and indeed the content. Who would have ever thought in those long ago days that the Institute would in the future be producing a journal in full colour. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Institute of Management Services 75th Anniversary
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.