Correspondence

The American Spectator, April 1999 | Go to article overview

Correspondence


Murphy's Law

I saw an item in your magazine that was as wrong as wrong could be (On the Prowl, TAS, March 1999). Since it purported to express my views, I was shocked. Next time ask me what my views are and I'll tell you, instead of printing such falsehoods.

I think Lamar Alexander has a strong shot at the GOP nomination. So does John McCain. Steve Forbes and Gary Bauer have absolutely no shot and they are not going to force anybody out of the race -let alone Alexander.

I have not "signed on" with any candidate. I'm giving free advice to my friends Governor Alexander and Senator McCain, my favorite candidates for the nomination.

-MIKE MURPHY

Falls Church, Virginia

Billy Gloat

Just a few things here, folks. First, now that the impeachment trial is over, don't you feel even a twinge of silliness for devoting your cover to Vernon Jordan and accompanying it with a story no one on the planet cares about ("False Witness," by Byron York, TAS, February 1999)? I also noticed you devoted nearly two entire stories to criticism of the New York Times, which forces me to ask the question: Don't you have anything better to do with your time? I must say it's a good thing no one devotes their entire publication to criticism of The American Spectator-they would have far too easy a time tearing it to pieces. So why don't you try something different in March? Try having some substance to your magazine instead of simply bitching about President Clinton, the New York Times, and the evil liberal empire. The American Spectator's ideology is tiresome as it is; things are only made worse when you can't even find anything worthwhile to distort.

-DAVID M. FARIS

Drew University

Madison, New Jersey

The most gratifying thing about this whole Clinton scandal comes from watching our more backward citizens squealing endlessly and redundantly about his getting away with it. Worse yet for you pathetic creatures is the knowledge that you haven't.

-PETE RORVIK

via the Internet

Kudos to Byron York and his Vernon Jordan article.

-MARC C. PORTER

via the Internet

Healing Physicians

Edward Grossman's article "God's Work" (TAS, February 1999) makes the observation that our modern medical system is not perfect; however, he fails to suggest a solution. He mocks systems analysis as a way to solve problems. Systems analysis examines each position in a chain of events where the system may fail and attempts to implement fail-safe mechanisms to prevent disaster. Systems analysis has proven effective in the airline industry, Space Shuttle program, and other mission-critical endeavors.

Misreading a drug prescription can have dire consequences. It seems trivial to suggest that bad handwriting may ultimately cause a patient's death. The simpleton's suggestion would be that doctors take time to write more neatly. …

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