Evaluation Overview for the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD) Project

By Davison, Kirsten K.; Falbe, Jennifer et al. | Childhood Obesity, February 1, 2015 | Go to article overview

Evaluation Overview for the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD) Project


Davison, Kirsten K., Falbe, Jennifer, Taveras, Elsie M., Gortmaker, Steve, Kulldorff, Martin, Perkins, Meghan, Blaine, Rachel E., Franckle, Rebecca L., Ganter, Claudia, Woo Baidal, Jennifer, Kwass, Jo-Ann, Buszkiewicz, James, Smith, Lauren, Land, Thomas, Childhood Obesity


[Author Affiliation]

Kirsten K. Davison. 1 Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. 4 Department of Social and Behavioral Science, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.

Jennifer Falbe. 2 Division of Community Health and Human Development, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA.

Elsie M. Taveras. 1 Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. 3 Division of General Academic Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, MA.

Steve Gortmaker. 4 Department of Social and Behavioral Science, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.

Martin Kulldorff. 5 Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

Meghan Perkins. 3 Division of General Academic Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, MA.

Rachel E. Blaine. 1 Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.

Rebecca L. Franckle. 1 Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. 4 Department of Social and Behavioral Science, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.

Claudia Ganter. 1 Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.

Jennifer Woo Baidal. 3 Division of General Academic Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, MA.

Jo-Ann Kwass. 6 Bureau of Community Health and Prevention, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Boston, MA.

James Buszkiewicz. 6 Bureau of Community Health and Prevention, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Boston, MA.

Lauren Smith. 7 National Initiative for Children's Health Quality, Boston, MA.

Thomas Land. 6 Bureau of Community Health and Prevention, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Boston, MA.

Address correspondence to: Kirsten K. Davison, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Building 2, Room 331, Boston MA 02115, E-mail: kdavison@hsph.harvard.edu

Introduction

Childhood obesity is one of the most pressing public health challenges of the times. In response to the complex etiology of obesity, there have been repeated calls for multilevel, multisector approaches to prevention and control of obesity.1 Such approaches are expected to have broad reach, thereby increasing their economic and social impact. A small number of studies have begun to provide an evidence base for multilevel, multisector whole-community interventions,2-6 but there remains a need for empirical evidence for such approaches in diverse settings in the United States. Consequently, the CDC funded the development and implementation of the Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (CORD) project.7

Guided by the obesity chronic care model8 and targeting predominantly low-income children ages 2-12 years, CORD is one of the first large-scale, federally funded research efforts to integrate clinical and public health evidence-based approaches to promote healthy lifestyle behaviors and reduce rates of obesity among children.7 CORD has field sites in Texas, California, and Massachusetts, with a fourth site serving as the evaluation center.9 In contrast to the model of implementing a standardized intervention across multiple sites, a novel feature of CORD is that each site is encouraged to tailor the intervention to the needs of their specific community.9 In addition, coordinated by the CORD Evaluation Center, intervention sites use a combination of site-specific and standardized cross-site measures. …

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