Urban Teacher Residencies: Indicators of Successful Recruitment

By Marshall, David T.; Scott, Michael R. | New Waves, December 2015 | Go to article overview

Urban Teacher Residencies: Indicators of Successful Recruitment


Marshall, David T., Scott, Michael R., New Waves


The United States of America has an aging teacher workforce. Within the near future, over one-third of the nation's teacher workforce will reach retirement age (Goldhaber & Walch, 2014), rendering the need for the preparation of highly qualified teachers to take their place. A larger problem is that many teachers are not remaining in the profession; the workforce is dominated by teachers that are under the age of 30 and over the age of 55 (Goldhaber & Walch, 2014). Reduction in class sizes in secondary classrooms, teacher attrition, and an aging workforce combine to create an increasingly dire teacher labor market (Loeb & Reininger, 2004; Goldhaber & Cohen, 2014). One-third of all teachers leave the profession within the first three years, and more than half of all urban teachers leave within five years (Barnes, Crowe, & Schaeffer, 2007), and this is often the result of a lack of preparation, not a lack of passion for teaching (Urban Teacher Residency United1 [UTRU], 2014a). Urban school districts experience an annual teacher attrition rate of about 20-25% (Ingersoll & Perda, 2009), leaving low-income and minority students the hardest hit by this constant turnover (Ingersoll, 2001). This not only means that a population with some of the greatest academic needs has the least experienced teachers to teach them, but that school districts with some of the most thinly stretched resources have to expend millions annually to attract, hire, and train new teachers (National Commission on Teaching and America's Future, 2007). Funds that could be used to purchase additional classroom resources have to be spent on this task.

Teacher residency models have been offered as a manner in which to prepare effective teachers (UTRU, n.d.). This model draws from aspects of both traditional teacher preparation models and alternative teacher preparation models. Similar to a medical residency model, teacher residency programs feature a pairing of theory and practice, where prospective teachers coteach alongside an established teacher for an entire year while taking course work on pedagogy. The Obama administration has promoted this model and the U.S. Department of Education (2014) has funded grants creating several teacher residency models in urban school districts. Urban teacher residency programs have had success in addressing the issue of urban teacher attrition, with 85% of their graduates remaining in the classroom after their initial four-year commitment of service (UTRU, 2014a). While this success is noteworthy, it remains important to identify those factors that lead to candidates' success in urban school districts. Although the selection process does not guarantee a successful teacher, understanding the selection process will help those who are interested in exploring a teacher residency program. Furthermore, by examining factors of selection, we propose continuing the conversation proposed by Stronge and Hindman (2003) that correlates factors considered in successful selection of teachers as indications of future success. Nevertheless, this paper proposes to discuss the importance of each indicator as individual factors in an applicant's portfolio for admission to the urban teacher residency program under study.

Review of Literature

Teacher Residency Programs

The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education [NCATE] (2010) recommends that along with Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores and grade point averages, multiple items should be taken into consideration when selecting teachers for teacher residency models. Useem (2001) examined teacher recruitment in the School District of Philadelphia. The process was perceived to be exceptionally lengthy, but was also streamlined and involved several assessments and interviews. Similarly, Solomon (2009) considered the recruitment strategies of the Boston Public Schools teacher residency program. While elements of NCATE's recommendation are present, and residents cannot be selected without interviews with both university and school district stakeholders; the most important baseline factor for this program is academic test scores. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Urban Teacher Residencies: Indicators of Successful Recruitment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.