British Columbia's Inland Rainforest: Ecology, Conservation, and Management

By Helman, Daniel S. | Electronic Green Journal, January 1, 2016 | Go to article overview

British Columbia's Inland Rainforest: Ecology, Conservation, and Management


Helman, Daniel S., Electronic Green Journal


Stevenson, Susan K., Armleder, Harold M., Arsenauly, André, Coxson, Darwyn, Delong, S. Craig and Jull, Michael. British Columbia's Inland Rainforest: Ecology, Conservation, and Management. Vancouver, Canada: University of British Columbia Press, 2011. 456 pp. ISBN: 9780774818506, paperback. US$ 41.95, illustrated. Also available in hardcover format ISBN 9780774818490.

A fact-filled and extremely useful offering from silvicultural and ecosystem professionals, biologists, ecologists, systems scientists and others, British Columbia's Inland Rainforest provides a snapshot, a look at the present conditions of this unique ecosystem in light of past and future management choices. Included are 128 figures, color plates and illustrations, 20 tables, three appendices, a species index, glossary and various exposés that highlight features of the text, which itself includes more than 50 sections detailing everything from carbon stocks to soil horizons to forest edge effects on plant and animal life to native medicine and many others. The book grew from a project with scientific goals-to supplement a government forestry report with data so that managers and other stakeholders could make well-informed choices. The authors made a wonderful choice to expand their scope and offer the work to the public.

British Columbia's inland rainforest is unique. There is no other place on the planet where a temperate rainforest exists so far from the coast, with much of its biome determined by continental rather than coastal geography. For example, many of the species in the inland rainforest migrated from elsewhere in continental North America during the end of the last glaciation, or from the coast via specific vectors. They continue to survive in a setting that includes thousand-year-old red cedar trees and lichen species (e.g. cyanolichen) that are not found elsewhere or nowhere else in such great diversity and abundance. Snowmelt during the summer promotes groundwater abundance and a humidity level unrivaled in a continental forest setting.

Here, ancient red cedar and western hemlock make unique rotted-out settings for fungus, bryophyte, lichen, vascular plants, invertebrates and vertebrate animals, dens in hollowed out trees for martens and black bears. Yet in human terms, the same trees providing the substrate for such a rich ecology have also driven management choices that have led to their destruction.

Historically, such immense trees with internal voids are called "decadent" and forest management has opted to harvest these old landscapes to allow planting of young plantation stands that replace them, often with changes to species for a standardized harvest regime. Ironically, the work is done in winter when the marshy rainforest soil has frozen and ice roads or other means of transport can be constructed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

British Columbia's Inland Rainforest: Ecology, Conservation, and Management
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.