Personality Type Effects on Perceptions of Online Credit Card Payment Services

By Walczak, Steven; Borkan, Gary L. | Journal of Theoretical and Applied Electronic Commerce Research, January 2016 | Go to article overview

Personality Type Effects on Perceptions of Online Credit Card Payment Services


Walczak, Steven, Borkan, Gary L., Journal of Theoretical and Applied Electronic Commerce Research


1 Introduction

Which e-commerce website features and mechanisms promote user perceptions of perceived ease-of-use and perceived benefit and consequently their intention to continue utilizing these e-commerce websites has been previously studied [43]. As an example, Walczak and Gregg [14], [38] demonstrate that website content features promote trust and consequently engender perceptions of corporate capability and intention to transact. However these studies are all based on a generic user-type representative of average consumer values across a particular region or even across the world, similar to personas. Variance among individuals is mostly ignored. While personas have been shown to be a beneficial tool for systems development [8], [24], [32], they provide too coarse a screen and designate all users into a very small number of prototypes (typically 3 or 4). To capture more individual nuances in e-commerce perceptions and utilization, a finer grained sieve is needed.

Examining electronic commerce utilization from an individual perspective is problematic due to the sheer volume of data that must be analyzed to ensure accuracy of the research model. Therefore, a classification schema for research populations that helps preserve individual differences is desired. Utilizing personality type indicators may provide such a classification technique. Personality profiling is becoming a more accepted and utilized methodology in education for better understanding individual student learning mechanisms [35] and in business to facilitate teamwork and customer relationship management [10]. Personality profiling has reportedly been used by a wide variety of organizations [11] including: Bank of America, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Cisco, Cricket, Denver International Airport, Great West Life, Hilton and Marriott hotels, Microsoft, National Semiconductor (Malaysia), Pratt & Whitney (Canada), Sembawang Logistics (Singapore), and the United States Air Force among others. Utilizing personality type in e-commerce research has been limited and merits further attention.

The research presented in this paper is a descriptive study that examines how personality type, as classified by the Myers-Briggs personality Type Indicator (MBTI) [27], affects perceptions of features that promote utilization of ecommerce payment portals by individuals and also which website features are considered as unimportant by different personality types. The examination of e-commerce payment portals and credit card online payment services (CC-OPS) in particular is important because e-commerce business relies heavily on credit card payments. In the USA alone in 2010, consumers carried $835.5 billion in credit card debt [12], which is distributed across 576.4 million individual credit cards [29]. In 2003, 13.8 percent of consumers paid some credit card bills online [18] and this number continues to grow. If personality dependent payment service website features can be identified, then ecommerce payment service designers may utilize these findings to understand how to customize web portals to attract or maintain usage of users with different personality types.

2 Background

Previous research examining interaction effects between personality and website usage typically examine a single trait or two and do not try to examine the whole personality. Early research on personality and Internet usage examined the relationship between extraversion and Internet usage [6], [16], [33]. One research study implied that extroverted versus introverted personality types account for much of the variance of Internet service usage and explained differences in utilization of Internet leisure services and social services [1]. Another study addressed Internet user behavior in light of a particular personality trait, focusing on the usage patterns of commercial websites by individuals with varying levels of a need for closure [17].

The Five Factor Model based on trait theory is one of the major frameworks currently used in the field of psychology to describe human personality traits [22]. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Personality Type Effects on Perceptions of Online Credit Card Payment Services
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.