Student Evaluation Response Rates of Teacher Performance in Higher Education Online Classes

By Paquette, Kelli R.; Corbett, Frank, Jr. et al. | Quarterly Review of Distance Education, January 1, 2015 | Go to article overview

Student Evaluation Response Rates of Teacher Performance in Higher Education Online Classes


Paquette, Kelli R., Corbett, Frank, Jr., Casses, Melissa, Quarterly Review of Distance Education


This growing market for online education in the United States has demonstrated sustainability and credibility with higher education and the general public. Millions of students are engaged in online education, encompassing $25 billion of annual tuition revenue (Gallagher & LaBrie, 2012). The number of students taking at least one online course has now surpassed 7.1 million and represents 33% (21.3 million) of all higher education students (Allen & Seaman, 2013). In the 2013 Survey of Online Learning Report, "The percent of academic leaders rating the learning outcomes in online education as the same or superior to those in face-to-face instruction grew from 57% in 2003 to 74% in 2013." These numbers represent current trends in education and offer insight into the wave of future students entering their collegiate careers. With the demand for online classes increasing, questions may arise as to the credibility of these courses, as well as to the instructional quality of those teaching online courses.

Students' evaluations of online course content and faculty instruction are important. Liu (2012) advised that student evaluations of online learning are critical to establish and maintain the integrity of online learning. Additionally, student evaluations of teaching have been a source of credibility with regard to advancement for teachers along with their continued reflection and growth as educators. This article describes the results of a 1.5-year study of student response rates for evaluations of faculty performance in higher education online classes. A review of the current literature regarding student evaluations of teaching in nontraditional online classes will be presented, as well.

PURPOSE

The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to identify the faculty and students' perceptions of the communication processes utilized in the presentation, delivery, and return of online evaluations of teacher performance. Norris and Conn (2005) expressed the need to collect impressions of student insight that would allow identification of variables that encourage or distract from their responses to online-delivered evaluations. Berk (2013) noted that despite the numerous research articles written on student evaluations of teaching in online environments, few have evaluated nontraditional online and/or blended classrooms. As a preliminary examination, faculty and students were asked to engage in a survey to gain understanding into the current use and perceptions of communication strategies used in online classrooms to deliver online evaluations. Additionally, interviews and a thorough literature review were conducted to answer the questions of this study.

HYPOTHESES

Student evaluations are important for online courses. When a concerted effort is given by faculty in higher education to explain the purpose of student evaluations, students will complete the evaluations and provide feedback to improve teaching and learning.

Research Questions

1. In what communication processes in the presentation and delivery of online student evaluations do faculty engage to encourage the completion of these evaluations?

2. How do students perceive and respond to communication regarding the completion and importance of online evaluations?

SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY

This study is significant because it furthers the investigation into methods and strategies that may enable students to complete online evaluations in higher education settings. A high student response rate is significant to faculty in higher education, as contract renewals are often dependent upon these student evaluations. Additionally, tenure and promotion committees highly value student evaluations. Berk (2013) surmised that the format of online teaching varies greatly from the online classroom, indicating that research must begin to address the needs of the entire evaluation process specifically for online and/or blended courses. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Student Evaluation Response Rates of Teacher Performance in Higher Education Online Classes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.