Legendary Lawmen: War Veterans Standout

VFW Magazine, March 1, 2016 | Go to article overview

Legendary Lawmen: War Veterans Standout


Thirteen law enforcement figures are recognized on these pages for their extraordinary contributions to protecting America and its communities. And they all uniquely served in the military.

William J. Bratton (1947-)

Agency (Primary): New York Police Department, Commissioner (2014-, 1994-96)

Distinction: Champion of community policing, he engineered an unprecedented reduction in crime by employing innovative methods

Law Enforcement Career (other):

Los Angeles Police Department, Chief (2002-09);

Boston Police Department (1970-83,1992-94)

Military Service: Army (Nov. 30,1966-Nov. 29,1969). Dog Handler, Specialist Four

War: Vietnam (May 1967-April 1968). 212th MP Company (Sentry Guard Dog), Long Binh

Raymond W. Kelly (1941-)

Agency (Primary): New York Police Department, Commissioner (1992-94,2002-2013)

Distinction: Created the first municipal police department counterterrorism bureau; it foiled 16 plots against the city

Law Enforcement Career (other):

U.S. Customs, Commissioner (1998-2001)

U.S. Dept, of Treasury, Undersecretary of Terrorism (1996-98)

Military Service: Marine Corps (1963-66). Artillery Forward Observer and Fire-Support Coordinator, 1st Lieutenant

War: Vietnam (August 1965-June 1966). Special Landing Force, 2nd Bn., 1st Marines, 1st Marine Div.

Robert S. Mueller III (1944- )

Agency (Primary): Federal Bureau of Investigation, Director (2001-13)

Distinction: Transformed FBI into an intelligence-based national security arm

Law Enforcement Career (other):

U.S. Attorney's Office (1976-88,1995-2001)

Dept, of Justice, Chief of Criminal Division (1990-93)

Military Service: Marine Corps (1966-70). Platoon commander and aide-de-camp to commanding general (May 17-Nov. 5, 1969) in Vietnam. Completed Army Rangerand airborne courses.

War: Vietnam (Nov. 17,1968-Nov. 5,1969). H Co., 2nd Bn., 4th Marines, 3rd Marine Div. Bronze Star and Navy Commendation Medal for valor, Purple Heart (seriously wounded on April 23, 1969) and Combat Action Ribbon.

Helped recover wounded Marines under fire on Mutter's Ridge and later courageously aided a beleaguered squad.

William H. Parker (1902-66)

Agency (Primary): Los Angeles Police Department, Chief (1950-66)

Distinction: One of the most prominent reformers of his generation, he turned the LAPD into the most professional police department of his era in the U.S.

Law Enforcement Career (other): LAPD. Patrolman to captain to inspector (192743,1947-49)

Military Service: Army (April 13,1943-Nov. 11,1945). Military Government Branch, Captain

War: World War II (overseas Aug. 27,1943-Fall 1945). Great Britain, France, North Africa, Italy/Sardinia, Germany and Austria. Planned and organized German POW detention and policing. Received a Purple Heart for wounds sustained in the Normandy invasion. After the war, he was in the Public Safety Branch of the Internal Affairs & Communications Division. There, he helped organize new police systems in Munich and Frankfurt.

Orlando Winfield Wilson (1900-72)

Agency (Primary): Chicago Police Department, Superintendent (1960-67); Wichita (Kan.) Police Department, Chief (1928-39)

Distinction: His biographer, in 1977, wrote that Wilson "was the greatest police authority American has yet produced." His "influence was pervasive. He changed the face of police administration," and "his record of accomplishments has been unsurpassed." The "father" of the Law Enforcement Code of Ethics and author of the "bible of police professionalism," he was a true pioneer who shaped the principles of a generation of police officers.

Law Enforcement Career (other):

Berkeley (Calif.) Police Department, Patrolman (1921-25);

School of Criminology at Berkeley, Dean (1950-60)

Military Service: Army, Corps of Military Police (Jan. 10,1943November 1946), Colonel

War: World War II (overseas, fall 1943-spring 1947). …

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