Efforts to Incorporate Social Justice Perspectives into a Family Training Program

By McGoldrick, Monica; Almeida, Rhea et al. | Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, April 1999 | Go to article overview

Efforts to Incorporate Social Justice Perspectives into a Family Training Program


McGoldrick, Monica, Almeida, Rhea, Preto, Nydia Garcia, Bibb, Amy, et al., Journal of Marital and Family Therapy


This paper describes the efforts of the faculty of the Family Institute of New Jersey in recent years to develop a collaborative family training program that takes into account issues of gender, race, culture, class, and sexual orientation. We have come to realize how strongly traditional approaches have been skewed in the direction of the dominant culture-white, male, heterosexist, and prioritizing the needs and experience of the middle and upper classes. We have attempted to modify our teaching, supervision, reading lists, and overall training approach to challenge trainees and ourselves to move toward broader, strength-based, and equity-based multicultural perspectives in our training. We describe our vision, how we incorporate it into our program structure, and a few of our training initiatives.

The question which one asks oneself begins at last to illuminate the world, and become one's keys to the experience of others. One can only face in others what one can face in oneself. On this confrontation depends the measure of our wisdom and compassion.

James Baldwin, Nobody Knows My Name

This paper describes our efforts at the Family Institute of New Jersey to develop a collaborative training program that takes into account issues of gender, race, culture, class, and sexual orientation. We will describe our vision, how we incorporate it into our program structure, and a few of our initiatives. We look forward to dialogue with others who are trying to expand in similar directions, in hopes that together we can progress toward more equitable training and family intervention. We have found this endeavor exciting, scary, difficult, frustrating, painful, and tremendously rewarding. We have expanded our vision from inclusion of a life cycle perspective that looked at women's and men's different social roles, to a framework that incorporates consideration of community and social influences on families as they move through time and space. We teach our students to use a very widely angled sociocultural lens that places families in the cultural, class, and gender contexts of the communities and society in which they live.

We have attempted to modify our teaching, supervision, reading lists, and overall training approach to challenge trainees and ourselves to move toward broader, strengthbased and equity-based multicultural perspectives in our family therapy training. We have come to realize how strongly traditional approaches have been skewed in the direction of the dominant culture-white, male, heterosexist, and prioritizing the needs and experience of the middle and upper classes (McGoldrick, 1998). We have rewritten our book on the Family Life Cycle (edited by Carter & McGoldrick, 1980, 1989, 1998), a core text in our program; Genograms (McGoldrick & Gerson, 1985, McGoldrick, Gerson, & Schnellenberger, 1999); and Ethnicity and Family Therapy, (McGoldrick, Pearce, & Giordono 1982, McGoldrick, Giordono, & Pearce 1996) to reflect the profound changes in our thinking about gender, race, class, and heterosexism. These efforts are works in progress, and although we are developing guidelines to help us in this difficult area and have put into practice many new initiatives, many questions remain unanswered. We believe we are at the very beginning of this transformation of training.

The Institute's Mission

It is not the individual organism that survives but the organism in the environment that gives it life. Relying on competition as a way of motivating learning eventually subverts not only cooperation but also willingness to learn. Learning is perhaps the only pleasure that might replace increasing consumption as our chosen mode of enriching experience...Ironically in our society both the strongest, those who have already succeeded, and the weakest, those who feel destined for failure, defend themselves against new learning.

Mary Catherine Bateson, Peripheral Visions

Since the 1980s, but especially in the past few years, our program has become further defined and expanded in its commitment to transform traditional family therapy by moving toward the integration of feminist and cultural perspectives into training. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Efforts to Incorporate Social Justice Perspectives into a Family Training Program
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.