Cued Language Structure: An Analysis of Cued American English Based on Linguistic Principles

By Paul, Peter V. | American Annals of the Deaf, March 1999 | Go to article overview

Cued Language Structure: An Analysis of Cued American English Based on Linguistic Principles


Paul, Peter V., American Annals of the Deaf


by E. Fleetwood and M. Metzger (Silver Spring, MD: Calliope Press; 1998, 96 pages, soft cover)

Let's assume there is some consensus that deaf and hard of hearing students need to be exposed to a reasonable, unambiguous model of English, whether they are attempting to learn it as a first or second language. Exposure is important for children to do their natural job of being little linguists. That the interpretation of "reasonable and unambiguous" varies is an understatement in the education of deaf and hard of hearing students. This is evident in the numerous signed systems that exist (e.g., Signed English, Seeing Essential English, Signing Exact English, Linguistics of Visual English, etc.) and a cued system, popularly known as Cued Speech, the linguistic application and visible characteristics of which are discussed as "cued language" in this text under review.

As a research scholar who has several published articles and books that have discussed the merits of the signed systems and oral approaches, I have become disenchanted with the overall effectiveness of these approaches, most of which have been in use for 20 years or more. Nevertheless, professionals need to be careful that disenchantment does not lead to hardening of the knowledge-seeking arteries. We need to continue to investigate the reasons for our relative lack of success in representing English in a reasonably clear and unambiguous manner for many deaf and hard of hearing students. We also need to inquire whether it is really feasible to attempt this representation in a mode that is different from the soken mode.

Cued Language Structure, with its eloquent style and lucid explanations, compels us to take yet another look at this business of representing English via the use of manual or hand symbols. In fewer than 100 pages (96 to be exact), this book covers quite a bit of ground with a Foreword, 6 chapters, an Afterword, a Glossary, and References. It also contains sidebars-further explanation or clarification of terms/topics in the margin at the right side of the text. The authors have done a fine job of making this book accessible to a broad audience.

The authors waste no time in addressing controversial, thought-provoking issues; the Foreword is replete with information, ranging from a few historical background perspectives to a brief description of each chapter to a compelling call for further investigation of the "linguistic claims" of "invented communication systems." In fact, the Foreword provides a synopsis of the major issues that are elaborated upon in the ensuing chapters. The most intriguing statement is one that has consumed me over the years: "Can a language that has traditionally been spoken and heard remain intact when conveyed with different articulators and in a different medium?" (p. 10).

In Chapter 1, the authors provide a good, brief description of the nature of linguistic competency, including a discussion of the difference between "structure" and "form." Many of us do not need to be convinced that "phonology" does not have to be rendered acoustically or be sound-based (consider sign languages, for starters) or that "speech" is a descriptive attribute of the user of a spoken language, rather than a requirement of that language. However, I am certain there are some of us in this field who might need more evidence for the following statements: "Acquiring the phonology of a language is the first step to learning about how its word parts can be manipulated to influence their meaning" (p. 17), and "The intonation and stress people use while speaking [or expressing] a language plays an important role in how people understand each other" (p. 19; words added). The authors provide some evidence for these assertions via the use of linguistic analysis, and there are a few references for obtaining further details and support. In addition, both the authors and I are in agreement that these assertions are also necessary for developing script literacy skills in English. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cued Language Structure: An Analysis of Cued American English Based on Linguistic Principles
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.