A Tribute to Jo Ann McFall

By Richardson, Lisa | Field Educator, Fall 2015 | Go to article overview

A Tribute to Jo Ann McFall


Richardson, Lisa, Field Educator


Editor's Note: In July 2015 Jo Ann McFall completed her term as Chair of the Council on Social Work Education's Council on Field Education and simultaneously retired from 23 years at the School of Social Work at Michigan State University. Jo Ann is the 2015 recipient of NANFED's Dean Schneck Memorial Award for Distinction in Social Work Field Education. Field Educator invited Lisa Richardson to pay tribute to Jo Ann's contributions as a leader in field education.

I still remember the first time I was in a meeting with Jo Ann McFall. It was in Philadelphia, at the 2008 Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) Annual Program Meeting, when I was just slightly over a year into my position as MSW Field Director. Like many social work field directors, I came from direct practice into the role. Probably also like many, I spent most of the first year discovering what I didn't know about field education. The early morning meeting was for Consortium Chairs of the North American Network of Field Educators and Directors (NANFED). Like so many other occasions in that first year, it was accelerating my sense of what I did not know. But I was struck by Jo Ann's contributions: insightful, direct, pragmatic, and credible. I was relieved to identify someone who I could reach out to as a mentor.

A couple of years later I found myself at the table with Jo Ann again, this time as appointees to the CSWE Council on Field Education (COFE). Jo Ann's capacity for diplomacy, her long view of field education, and her reasoned approach to problem solving led the COFE members to enthusiastically endorse her for COFE chair. Who better suited to take the helm and lead us, and lead social work field education nationally, than Jo Ann?

I share these personal impressions because they reflect what field educators around the country have said when speaking of Jo Ann. In July, when Jo Ann posted on the Field Directors List Serve that she was completing her term as COFE chair, the email list bubbled with responses. Jo Ann was described as a skillful leader, dedicated to field education. She was recognized for her many contributions, including navigating initiatives such as the 2015 Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS), the 2014 Field Summit, and the COFE-sponsored field directors' survey. In the words of one colleague, COFE "catapulted forward" under her leadership. In the words of another, Jo Ann's effort "has made the rest of our jobs easier and has helped elevate field to its deserved status." As we have entered into this era of field as the "signature pedagogy," Jo Ann has been an effective advocate, able to represent the strategic interests of field education to a larger audience.

As Jo Ann's term on COFE ends, so ends an impressive tenure at Michigan State University (MSU). Jo Ann served as the Associate Director for Field Education for 19 years. MSU's social work field department covers over 300 BSW and MSW field placements in urban, suburban, and rural settings across the state through both campus-based and distance learning programs. As Jo Ann approached this year's retirement, her role was recalibrated with an emphasis on community engagement - something every school should be considering as a natural extension of the relationships built through field education.

Jo Ann's embodiment of the field director role serves as an exemplar for all of us. The complex skills required to fulfill the role of field director have been more explicitly recognized in recent years. But the arc of Jo Ann's career demonstrates the potential for this constellation of skills to impact students and colleagues, pedagogy and scholarship, both within and beyond one's own institution. Betsy Voshel, Director of Field Instruction at the University of Michigan, described Jo Ann's approach to student learning as balancing support for student performance with regard for the clients they serve. Betsy reports she learned from Jo Ann "to set my expectations high and then find ways to assist students to achieve, and to do this in a professional manner with compassion and respect. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Tribute to Jo Ann McFall
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.