Parmanu Politics: Indian Political Parties and Nuclear Weapons

By Patil, Kapil | Indian Foreign Affairs Journal, April-June 2015 | Go to article overview

Parmanu Politics: Indian Political Parties and Nuclear Weapons


Patil, Kapil, Indian Foreign Affairs Journal


Sitakanta Mishra, Parmanu Politics: Indian Political Parties and Nuclear Weapons, (New Delhi: Kalpaz Publications, 2015), Pages: 326, Price: INR 950.00.

Why do states build nuclear weapons? Explaining this age-old proliferation puzzle has been an important scholarly endeavour for nuclear policy analysts since the end of the Cold War. The renewed proliferation threats in the post- Cold War years marked by a change in global distribution of power has necessitated that the proliferation problem must be addressed with new nonproliferation policies. The quest for understanding the proliferation dynamics thus has yielded a substantive body of scholarship, with diverse theoretical approaches, such as classical realism, neo-realism, organisational culture and domestic politics models, and psychological and sociological approaches. Although the realist approach dominates much of the scholarship on proliferation behaviour, the insights into the proliferation dynamics as revealed by approaches like domestic politics have been found to be particularly useful for predicting proliferation behaviour and formulating new non-proliferation strategies.

This book makes an important contribution to this strand of literature by tracing the historical evolution of the perspectives of three mainstream political parties in India namely, the Indian National Congress (INC), the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) and the Communist Party of India- Marxist (CPI-M) on nuclear weapons issues. It brings out the untold story of the internal churning within these parties on nuclear weapons issues and its impact on shaping the country's nuclear decision-making in different historical periods. Political parties are one of the indispensable institutional actors through which power is exercised in a democracy. The constitutional autonomy that the political parties in India are bestowed with enables them not only to shape the political agenda but also mobilise public opinion on crucial issues, such as nuclear weapons' policy. Their ideas, beliefs and interests, thus, have become useful analytical variables in understanding the political behaviour and policy outcomes in a democracy. By dwelling on these important domestic actors, this book fills a void in extant scholarship on India's nuclear policy, which remains heavily skewed towards the role of structural conditions in shaping the country's nuclear behaviour.

At the outset, the author lays down a coherent conceptual framework by identifying four distinct characteristics of political parties for evaluating their impact on India's nuclear policymaking. The author then delineates the political nuclear interface by identifying relevant domestic political actors who have exerted considerable influence on nuclear weapons related decision-making. The novelty of this book, however, lies in the adoption of a unique methodological approach that relies on hitherto unexplored archival sources, such as various party proceedings, resolutions, and pronouncements for capturing the domestic impulses.

The author brings out the sharp contrast in the ways the mainstream political parties perceive various regional and international security challenges. Through comparative analysis, he highlights how the three political parties differed in their judgement of the utility of nuclear weapons in addressing security challenges facing the country. This is essential for understanding the "status-quoist" and "revisionist" tendencies that the three national political parties have come to demonstrate on nuclear weapons issues over a long historical period. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Parmanu Politics: Indian Political Parties and Nuclear Weapons
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.