Landmark Documents in American History, Version 2.0

By Congress, Marge | MultiMedia Schools, May/June 1999 | Go to article overview

Landmark Documents in American History, Version 2.0


Congress, Marge, MultiMedia Schools


Company: Facts on File, 11 Penn Plaza, New York, NY 10001; U.S.: 800/322-8755; 212/967-8800; Canada: 800/443-8323; Fax: 800/678-3633; techsupport@facstonfile.com; http:// www.factsonfile.com/.

Price: $150.00-Windows and Macintosh versions; $700.00-5 user license; network license available; $99.00-update an older version to version 2.0.

Audience: High School Format: CD-ROM: text, audio, video, photographs, and illustrations System Requirements: Minimum for PC: 486/16, Windows 3.1, 8 MB RAM, 10 MB free hard disk space, color monitor, printer, mouse, 2x CDROM, and sound card. Minimum for

Macintosh: 68040, System 7.1, 8 MB RAM, 10 MB available hard disk space, color monitor, printer, and 2x CDROM. Network must be Ethernet.

Description: Landmark Documents in American History 2.0 provides more than 1,300 documents in full text. Each document has a brief introduction and includes a "further reading" section. There are more than 500 photographs and drawings, 30 minutes of video clips, 20 minutes of audio clips, and more than 250 biographies. Documents begin with the 1492 "Privileges and perogatives granted to Columbus" and end with current pieces such as President Clinton's Second Inaugural Address. All information can be placed on a notepad or exported to a disk. Reviewer Comments:

Installation: This disk installed with a minimum of time and no difficulty. Installation Rating: A

Content/Features: Landmark Documents is an interactive program that enables the user to go from document to biography to picture to video to related documents with the click of a mouse.

The program helps the user to understand an event within a very broad context and requires the use of the higher learning skills stressed in education today. General Douglas MacArthur's "Old Soldiers Never Die" speech is a good case in point. After examining a biography and the speech, the user can pull up related documents and biographies of others involved in the same events.

The biographies vary in length from one to three pages. The biography of Chief Joseph (listed as Joseph, Chief is three pages; most other American political personalities are one or two pages in length.

Various methods can be used to locate information. Documents can be found by subject, historical period, or individuals. When the selection is pulled up, the entire document appears. Users can then go to related documents, biographies, multimedia, etc. When Multimedia is selected, the user can see the available videos and portraits. The videos are excellent, with extremely clear sound. When a portrait is pulled up, related documents also can be viewed. After looking at former President Jimmy Carter's portrait, for example, I could go to 22 related documents about him.

One outstanding feature of this program is the pathway to the World Wide Web. At any screen, the "Option" line will send the user to the Web if the computer is hooked up to Internet. …

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