Did You Know Bibliotherapy Can Lift Your Mood and Cure Depression?

Hindustan Times (New Delhi, India), June 21, 2016 | Go to article overview

Did You Know Bibliotherapy Can Lift Your Mood and Cure Depression?


Mumbai, June 20 -- When you're feeling low, what if the doctor recommended a daily dose of books by authors such as Haruki Murakami, Franz Kafka and Charles Dickens? A workshop conducted in the city last month, titled Restorative Power Of Reading, demonstrated that the concept, known as bibliotherapy, isn't as outrageous as it sounds. A form of cognitive therapy, bibliotherapy is not only used to lift one's mood and cure depression, but also aids in the treatment of various mental-health disorders.

Novel cure

Practised around the world by psychologists, social workers, and counsellors, bibliotherapy is largely considered as "reading for therapeutic effect". According to psychotherapist and counsellor Kunjal Shah, "Bibliotherapy simply means the usage of selected books to guide a person in the area that he or she seeks help in. It's like having a dialogue with a book - using its concepts as food for thought, trying to slowly apply it in life and checking if it really helps." From a clinical aspect, a psychotherapist or a bibliotherapist prescribes books to deal with ailments such as anxiety, autism, depression, eating disorders, OCD (Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder), phobias, addiction and other health-related issues. Talking about the healing power of words, literary agent Sherna Khambatta says, "Studies have shown that if you read some text, it remains with you for four days. As you can picture the book, it changes the way your brain is structured and how chemicals are released."

How it works

While one can look up various curative books on the Internet, those who are ailing are given a prescription specific to their illness in a literary counselling session. "I've found books such as The Road Less Travelled by Scott Peck or Man's Search For Meaning by Viktor Frankl work for specific cases. The ideas in these books are discussed either by noting one's thoughts in a diary, through support groups and group therapy, or with a practitioner during individual sessions. Things are taken ahead from there," explains Shah. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Did You Know Bibliotherapy Can Lift Your Mood and Cure Depression?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.