Southern Women in Revolution, 1776-1800: Personal and Political Narratives

By van Zelm, Antoinette G. | The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Autumn 1998 | Go to article overview

Southern Women in Revolution, 1776-1800: Personal and Political Narratives


van Zelm, Antoinette G., The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography


Southern Women in Revolution, 1776-1800: Personal and Political Narratives. By CYNTHIA A. KIERNER. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1998. xviii, 253 pp. $34.95.

WITH an intriguing blend of conviction and deference, southern women petitioned their state legislatures for redress of a variety of grievances during and after the Revolutionary War. Widows of American soldiers tried to recover arrears in pay due to their husbands; wives of banished Tories sought their repatriation; women deserted by their husbands asked to be granted separate estates; newly freed AfricanAmerican women requested formal acknowledgment of their emancipation. In Southern Women in Revolution, Cynthia A. Kierner explores these and other moving stories of fractured families and blossoming political consciousness. Her documentary edition of ninety-eight petitions submitted by women from the Carolinas is both a fine work of social history and an illuminating examination of female citizenship.

Between 1776 and 1800, the legislatures of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia received at least 780 petitions from women, a significant increase over the previous quarter century. Kierner decided to focus on petitions from the Carolinas because of the keen similarities in the wartime experiences of women from those two states. The petitions in Southern Women in Revolution are divided into thematic chapters on family life during the war, the conflict's economic legacy for Whig women, the postwar claims of Loyalist women, the language in which petitioners couched their appeals, and the influence of revolutionary ideology on gender and race relations. Interpretive essays, which discuss petitions from all four southern states, introduce each chapter. Brief biographical sketches precede each petition and indicate whether it succeeded. Two appendices compare women's petitions by subject for North Carolina and South Carolina.

Kierner argues successfully that petitioning was a significant political act for women. As the only formal means by which women could participate in political life, petitioning represented an important step in the transition from dependency to citizenship. With attention to both the substance and style of women's petitions, Kierner shows how difficult it was for women to make this progression. Despite their active support for the war effort, most of the petitioners presented themselves as "marginal members of a political community" rather than as citizens (p. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Southern Women in Revolution, 1776-1800: Personal and Political Narratives
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.