A History of Music Therapy Journal Articles Published in the English Language

By Brooks, Darlene | Journal of Music Therapy, Summer 2003 | Go to article overview

A History of Music Therapy Journal Articles Published in the English Language


Brooks, Darlene, Journal of Music Therapy


Music therapists have had an interest in bibliographic research for over 20 years, beginning with Jellison's 1973 analysis of the frequency and types of articles appearing in the existing music therapy literature. Since then, several other researchers have continued in this line of inquiry. The purpose of this study was to (a) identify historical trends in the types of articles that have been published in major music therapy periodicals in the English language, (b) identify historical trends for each type of article within each music therapy journal, (c) to compare percentages of article types within each music therapy journal and (d) to compare percentages of article types across journals. Specifically, how many quantitative, qualitative, historical, philosophical/theoretical, clinical and professional articles have been published throughout the history of the following journals: Journal of Music Therapy, Music Therapy: Journal of the American Association for Music Therapy, Music Therapy Perspectives, The Arts in Psychotherapy, Journal of the Association for Music & Imagery, The Australian Journal of Music Therapy, The Nordic Journal of Music Therapy, The British Journal of Music Therapy, and The New Zealand Society for Music Therapy Journal.

Bibliographic research has been of continuing interest to the music therapy community since inception of the first refereed journal in the English language. For example, the Journal of Music Therapy was founded in 1964, and only 9 years later Jellison (1973) undertook the first bibliographic study, analyzing the frequency and types of articles appearing in that journal, as well as its predecessor, the Music Therapy Book of Proceedings. Since then, several other researchers have continued with this line of inquiry.

Bibliographic research has been important to the field because of the many valuable insights it provided into the development of music therapy as a profession. Bibliographic studies have revealed (a) how research efforts parallel growth and development of the profession (Gilbert, 1979; Jellison, 1973); (b) the various topics of greatest interest to journal contributors (Decuir, 1987; Gilbert, 1979); (c) demographic information about journal contributors (Decuir, 1987;James, 1985); (d) the clinical populations most often studied, the nature of research environments in the field (Codding, 1987; Decuir, 1987; Gilbert, 1979; Wheeler, 1988); (e) the evolution of clinical, educational, and training programs (Decuir, 1987); (f) the myriad relationships between theory, research, and practice (Gfeller, 1987); (g) those areas of music therapy practice where there is insufficient research; and (h) important research agendas for the future (Gfeller, 1995; Gilbert, 1979; Wheeler, 1988).

An analysis of the literature has revealed that bibliographic research has taken three methodological directions: The first was an examination of articles on specific topics appearing in one or more journals. For example Standley (1986) presented a meta-analysis on music research in medical/dental treatment from 1950-1985. Toomey (1996-1997) surveyed publications on Guided Imagery and Music (GIM), and summarized the findings according to topical categories. Brotons, Koger, and Pickett-Cooper (1997) examined the literature on music/music therapy and the dementias from 1985 to 1996. Gregory (2000) studied the Journal of Music Therapy from 1984-1997 in an effort to determine test instruments used in studies and in 2002, Gregory searched 40 years of the journal of Music Therapy to examine the behavioral research approaches used in music therapy research.

The second direction has been the establishment of indices and databases on graduate research done in colleges and universities in the United States. Maranto and Bruscia (1988) were the first to publish an index with abstracts of Master's Theses in music therapy done in the USA from 1941 to 1986. Chariker (1997) extended the work of Maranto and Bruscia by compiling the same information for Master's Theses from 1987 to 1997. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A History of Music Therapy Journal Articles Published in the English Language
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.