Web Briefs

By Yannie, Mark | Journal of Information Ethics, April 1, 2016 | Go to article overview

Web Briefs


Yannie, Mark, Journal of Information Ethics


Globethics.net

http:// www. globethics. net/

Headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, Globethics.net is a non- profit global network of persons and institutions interested in various fields of applied ethics. It offers access to a large number of resources, especially through its leading global digital ethics library, and facilitates collaborative web- based research, conferences, online publishing, and information sharing. Funding comes mainly from donations and partly from services delivered and common projects with partners. Major donors include the Swiss Development Cooperation and private foundations. The organization currently has registered participants from over 200 countries. Many Globethics.net participants are in academic professions of applied ethics, but are also activists, religious leaders, and members of private companies and the public sector. Links include About Us, News, Partners, Publications, Jobs, and Donations. About Us includes Board and Staff, National Contacts (with photos, contact information, websites), Annual Reports for its ¡0 years of existence, Participants, Regional Programs, and Statutes of the Foundation. News includes articles divided by Ethics, Research, Corporate Responsibility, and an outline template for submitting news to infoweb@globethics.net. Partners is subdivided into various types of partnership: Partner Websites, Regional Program partners, Scientific partners, Library partners, Networking partners, Funding partners, Service partners, Project partners, and Media partners, as well as links to other sources. The site is searchable and is an excellent source for news, study, or international networking.

Right 2 Info

http:// right2info. org

This site brings together information on the constitutional and legal framework for the right of access to information as well case law from more than 80 countries, organized and analyzed by topic. Launched in 2008 by the Open Society Justice Initiative (an organization that promotes human rights and builds legal capacity for open societies- https:// www. opensocietyfoundations. org), it aims to advance the rights to information by enabling right to information (RTI) advocates around the world to share information and analyses with each other. This information includes case decisions, legislative provisions, and reasoning for decisions taken; promoting the development of jurisprudence at the national and regional levels; promoting the adoption and reform of laws, regulations, and implementing mechanisms. The site is searchable by basic word or guided keyword, as well as via a site map. There is a command bar which presents "Cases" (summaries of a selection of judgments on the right to information issued by national and regional courts and the UN Human Rights Committee), "Laws" (links to access to information and related laws, regulations and constitutional provisions, relating to state and official secrets, data protection, archives, legislative and judicial information), "Resources" (websites, publications, videos), and "Standards" (links to relevant treaties and other instruments of intergovernmental organizations). The international scope of this website could be very useful to researchers in politics, business, and human rights.

Center for Security Policy

https://www.centerforsecuritypolicy. org/category/national-security-new-media/

The Washington, D.C.-based Center is a not- for-profit, non- partisan, educational corporation established in ¡988. Under Frank Gaffney's leadership, the Center has been nationally and internationally recognized as a resource for timely and informed analyses of foreign and defense policy matters. …

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