Do It! Cuban Culture Event, Rex Navarette, Chaminade Theatre Festival

By Mark, Steven | Honolulu Star - Advertiser, July 27, 2016 | Go to article overview

Do It! Cuban Culture Event, Rex Navarette, Chaminade Theatre Festival


Mark, Steven, Honolulu Star - Advertiser


FRIDAY

Cuban culture heats up event at art museum

We all know that Cuban culture is hot, hot, hot, while U.S. relations with Cuba have been cold, cold, cold. But with conditions now thawing, the Honolulu Museum of Art is celebrating.

"We chose Cuba because it's a pretty exciting time in history for Cuba," said Rebecca Barat, special-events coordinator for the museum.

Guests will be entertained by a salsa performance by Linda Melodia Dance Company, with lessons for visitors. They can then join in on the fun to music by Rolando Sanchez and Salsa Hawaii. "He'll have a very 'caliente' performance," Barat said, translating: "Very hot, in a good way."

Flamenco guitarist Thi Van Nguyen and DJ Roman Candles will provide more musical entertainment. Visitors can also try their hand at cubilete, a pokerlike game that uses dice instead of cards, or Cuban dominoes, which is considered the national game of Cuba.

While the museum does not have a Cuban art collection, there will be an art game during which people can match up works from the museum's collection with aspects of Cuban life. "It will say, 'Find people enjoying a game outdoors or an antique car,' and people will have to go into our collection of contemporary art and find those things," Barat said.

Be sure to come hungry. Chicken empanadas, Frita Cubana sliders, island fish escabeche and Cuban-style pork adobo from Honolulu chef Sean Priester, pictured inset, will be among the food available.

Where: Honolulu Museum of Art

When: 6-9 p.m. today

Cost: $25, free for museum members

Info: artafterdark.org or 532-8700

FRIDAY-AUG. 14

Chaminade Theatre Festival showcases the talents of young adults

College theater students from Hawaii and around the country will stage three plays over the next few weekends at Chaminade University's Collegiate Theatre Festival.

Tonight and Saturday the festival spotlights "Next to Normal," a story about a mother's struggle with bipolar disorder. The rock musical won three Tony Awards in 2009 and the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, becoming just the eighth musical in history to win the prize.

From Aug. 4-6 students will stage "Almost Maine," a series of vignettes about love and lost love in a town so remote that it's as if it "almost" doesn't exist. The third production is "Rose and the Rime," a children's story about a town cursed to a wintry existence and the young girl who saves it. It will be staged from Aug. 5-7 and 11-14 at the Loo Theatre.

The festival began last year as a dance program that attracted local students who attended colleges around the country. It has evolved into an intensive theater program involving students from San Diego, St. Louis, Seattle and Hawaii, who have been working for eight weeks on acting, directing, costuming, set design and technical production.

"It's all student-driven. All three directors are graduate students at the University of Hawaii," notes Christopher Patrinos, a staff member at Chaminade who is organizing the festival.

Kevin Berg directs "Next to Normal" Patrinos, who is also a graduate theater student at UH, directs "Almost Maine" and Nathaniel Niemi, who recently won a directing award from the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival in Washington, D. …

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