The Oxford Handbook of the English Revolution

By Loxley, James | The Seventeenth Century, April 1, 2016 | Go to article overview

The Oxford Handbook of the English Revolution


Loxley, James, The Seventeenth Century


The Oxford handbook of the English Revolution, edited by Michael J. Braddick, Oxford Handbooks in History, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2015, 640 pp., £95.00 (hardback), ISBN 978-0-19-969589-8

Where are we at, now, with the study of "the English Revolution"? It has been a long time since such a label became contentious, even longer - of course - since it was posited as a way of integrating the socio-political struggles of mid-seventeenth-century England into a grander European, or world, narrative of modernisation. As Mike Braddick notes in his introduction to this volume, the sustained revisionist reaction against Whig or Marxist "progressive accounts" of mid-century events has moderated, modulated, and dissipated since its first emergence, and revisionism itself "is now being historicised" (4).

It might seem odd, therefore, that a volume with a title such as this should emerge just now. What is left of the English Revolution? Well, as the volume's contents make clear, its Englishness is a clear casualty of recent debates - or rather, the notion that its Englishness allows it to be studied in splendid, sui generis insularity. Braddick's introduction makes it clear that the volume is actually concerned with the rather less snappily-titled topic of "Civil War and Revolution in England, Scotland, and Ireland." (Whither, here, Wales? Not entirely absent in the rest of the volume, thankfully, though its awkward status within the three kingdoms and four nations makes it a fitful presence). And fully nine of its 33 chapters are explicitly concerned with developments outwith England, while the treatments of transnational topics or areas of concern elsewhere in the volume often show commendable awareness of the more-than-Englishness of so much of the political and cultural activity traced here.

So what of the revolution? The volume is in the - in this instance - happy situation of permitting the term as a structural presence, but allowing its informed and careful critique in its chapters. Thus, what could have been a real constraint becomes an advantage. Braddick's contributors, for the most part, rise to the challenge of thinking through a label which none of them are willing to employ as an uncritically organising principle. To this extent, the fecundity of current scholarship on mid-seventeenth-century turbulence is fully represented here.

Indeed, this is one of the collection's real strengths. Braddick has wisely chosen to represent the multiple dimensions and perspectives through which scholarly enquiry into these revolutionary years has taken place by organising his chapters according to overlapping and varying categories. So an initial section on "Events," which encompasses excellent essays by Julian Goodare, Richard Cust, Joseph Cope, the editor, Laura Stewart, Michéal O Siochrú, Philip Baker, Derek Hirst, David Smith, and Tim Harris (a veritable A-list of contributors, this), provides a series of overviews, framed by the demands of narrative but always analytical, of the terrain invoked in Braddick's title for his introductory chapter (plus Wales). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Oxford Handbook of the English Revolution
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.