Jerry Drives 'Comedians' into the Emmy Frenzy

By Schwindt, Oriana | Variety, August 9, 2016 | Go to article overview

Jerry Drives 'Comedians' into the Emmy Frenzy


Schwindt, Oriana, Variety


"Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee" is perhaps an overlong title for a series, but it's an accurate reflection of just what happens in Jerry Seinfeld's talk show. And now after eight seasons on Crackle over the last four years, it has broken through to the Emmy Big Leagues with a nomination for outstanding variety talk series, joining mainstream shows like "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon" and "Last Week Tonight With John Oliver."

Much of the talk around the show tends to focus on the comedians - or, in the case of President Obama, public figures - who join Seinfeld in each episode. Seinfeld chums Larry David and Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Don Rickles and Tina Fey, have all gone on a coffee run with the host, who describes himself as "a one-man car culture," the owner of a veritable fleet of rare vehicles classic and contemporary.

But don't skip out on the "coffee" part. "I definitely want to get a good cup of coffee when I go out, so that's a very big part of the show for me," Seinfeld says.

So who makes the best cup? "Oh, my wife, absolutely," Seinfeld says, laughing, after his wife, Jessica, hands him a cup, his first of the day, even though it's approaching 2:30 in the afternoon.

This was a surprise nomination and the first in a major category for Crackle. Crackle GM Eric Berger said they felt it was time to submit you in the variety talk series category instead of shortform. Were you part of that decision?

I think there was a conversation about it, but I'm a little vague. But you know, this has been such an exciting Lewis-and-Clark, "paddle down the river and see what's down there" adventure, there was no expectation of anything. I'm flattered and humbled our little show has gotten this far. We didn't even know if audiences would watch a TV show on the internet every week. Nobody knew if it would work - most people told me it wouldn't. I knew right away that the internet is just another network. The idea of only a few people being in charge of cameras and transmission - I think we all knew that was over. It's up to the artist to figure out what to make and how to put it out there, and audiences have to figure out how to find it. At the same time, we're in 1951, when television was just beginning.

It's fascinating to see all the ways people are trying to figure out how to make money in this way, too.

Oh, that's been the challenge. We were very fortunate to have Acura see the potential in the show, and I don't think they ever thought we would be doing a show with the president at the White House, and getting Emmy nominations, so we're very happy about it. …

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