Ambassadors of U.S. Higher Education: Quality Credit-Bearing Programs Abroad

By Dalrymple, Margaret | College and University, Winter 1999 | Go to article overview

Ambassadors of U.S. Higher Education: Quality Credit-Bearing Programs Abroad


Dalrymple, Margaret, College and University


Ambassadors of US. Higher Education: Quality Credit-Bearing Programs Abroad

The College Board, 1997

112 pages, $27.95

With the growth of credit-bearing programs abroad there arises the need for standards of quality and consistency. The collection of articles serves here as a guide to those involved in global education in their attempts to abide by their home institution and host country parameters.

As John Dupree states in Chapter 1, "Introduction: A Growing Trend in Educational Delivery," the book strives to present a set of standards for use of US credit-bearing programs abroad and to serve as a primer for institutions considering the development of these programs. To that end, Marjorie Peace Lenn discusses the growth of this new trend and gives examples of regional accreditation groups highlighting the lack of core standards and coordination between US agencies and international educational bodies. The following chapter, by Steven Crow, gives a brief history of evaluating programs abroad, with special attention to the necessity of coordinating efforts in maintaining educational quality. Crow's essay is followed by two chapters covering the accreditation process. The first presents a detailed explanation of the US system, along with a review of the educational objectives, evaluation, and assessment in international settings. The second provides clear examples of international initiatives, including the National Architectural Accrediting Board's (NAAB) agreement with the Canadian Architectural Certification Board (CACB) by which they recognize each other's equal authority in accreditation for the licensure and registration in both countries. The book then turns to two case studies. The first, by Jared Dorn, examines the history of American higher education branch campuses in Japan, shedding light on their success and failures. Chapter 6, "A Twinning Program in Malaysia: Lessons from the Field," encompasses the book's second case study, this time drawing attention to credit-bearing programs involving an international institution and a US institution. …

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