Topical Stories Highlight Plight of 20th-Century Refugees

By Chisvin, Sharon | Winnipeg Free Press, September 17, 2016 | Go to article overview

Topical Stories Highlight Plight of 20th-Century Refugees


Chisvin, Sharon, Winnipeg Free Press


There are currently an estimated 60 million refugees in the world seeking a place to call home. But the refugee crisis, although larger than it has been in decades, is hardly a new phenomenon.

As Ottawa writer Lyse Champagne so eloquently reminds readers in her new book, The Light That Remains , as long as and wherever there has been war, civil unrest and totalitarianism, there have been innocent people who have been uprooted, displaced and forced to flee for their lives.

Champagne's new book, written separately in English and in French, is a collection of six short stories about people who have already become or are about to become refugees. But though the stories and their characters are fictionalized, the events on which they are based are historically accurate. Spanning the 20th century, these events, horrifying and incomprehensible, inform and infiltrate every exchange of dialogue, every action and every memory.

In The Map of Europe , two sisters in Turkey, separated for the first time when one leaves town with her new husband, innocently exchange nostalgic letters on the eve of the Armenian genocide. In The View from the Bluff , a Ukrainian girl loses herself in intricate embroidery work as the Holodomor looms, and in Breathing , a Cambodian refugee, living safely in Canada for years, conjures up painful memories of his past during a theatrical performance.

Other stories, equally harrowing in detail, concern the Nanjing massacre, the Vichy government's 1942 deportation of French Jews during the Holocaust, and the Rwandan genocide.

This last story, At the Bank of the Akanyaru River , is perhaps the most haunting tale in this collection, even as it speaks to the same themes as all the other stories. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Topical Stories Highlight Plight of 20th-Century Refugees
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.