Halifax Police Chief Says U.S. Strife Can Challenge Law Enforcement in Canada

By Doucette, Keith | The Canadian Press, September 23, 2016 | Go to article overview

Halifax Police Chief Says U.S. Strife Can Challenge Law Enforcement in Canada


Doucette, Keith, The Canadian Press


Canadian police 'wear' U.S. strife: chief

--

HALIFAX - Halifax's police chief says law enforcement in this country is inevitably challenged by police-civilian conflicts in the United States, but Canadians need to know things are different on this side of the border.

Halifax Regional Police Chief Jean-Michel Blais said Canadian police often "end up wearing" U.S. law enforcement issues, particularly as a result of highly charged incidents in places such as Orlando, Dallas, Baton Rouge, and North Carolina.

"One of the biggest challenges is dealing with those perceptions, both public and individual, that very often have no basis in fact," Blais told a business audience Friday. "Unfortunately these perceptions have a direct link to public trust."

He said the growing linkage that occurs through social media has led him to devise his own definition of the so-called Ferguson effect, named for the Missouri city that became a flashpoint for civilian protests after a 2014 police shooting.

"Whereas in the U.S. the term Ferguson effect refers to the reticence that some police officers may have in dealing with certain citizens for fear of being labelled a racist, for me the Ferguson effect essentially means what happens there, matters here."

Blais said people need to know that there are many differences in how police operate on both sides of the border.

He said unlike Canada, the majority of police in the U.S. have no civilian oversight and don't have the ongoing training that is a priority here. He said surplus military hardware does not go to Canadian police, and police and other justice officials are not elected as some sheriffs and judges are in the U.S.

Blais said Canadian police don't get revenue from tickets, something he said has led to "repression" in the U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Halifax Police Chief Says U.S. Strife Can Challenge Law Enforcement in Canada
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.