Cowboy Crossings: National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, October 15-December 31

By Kolpas, Norman | Southwest Art, October 2016 | Go to article overview

Cowboy Crossings: National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, October 15-December 31


Kolpas, Norman, Southwest Art


MANY LOVERS of art evoking America's Old West may consider greats like Frederic Remington or Charles M. Russell to be the first who truly evoked the cowboy and ranching life in exalted aesthetic form. But an exhibition opening to the public at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum on Saturday, October 15-and debuting two days earlier with a roster of ticketed preview events-makes it clear that the roots of cowboy art not only spread far wider and deeper but also thrive today in abundant and varied forms.

The aptly entitled Cowboy Crossings, which celebrates its fifth year in this form, brings together two complementary events: the 51st annual sale and exhibition of the Cowboy Artists of America, which dedicates itself to perpetuating the culture of western life through fine art, and the 18th annual sale and exhibition of the Traditional Cowboy Arts Association, a group that aims to preserve and promote the practical arts of saddlemaking, bit and spur making, silversmithing, and rawhide braiding and their roles in cowboy culture. Exhibiting members of both organizations are on hand to mingle with collectors over dinner at Oklahoma City's Petroleum Club on Thursday, October 13, and during an exclusive preview the following evening. They are also on hand in the museum to delight opening-day visitors with such events as an autograph party at 9 a.m. and demos by select artists at 1 p.m. That evening, all works are available for sale through a fixed-price drawing beginning at 6:30 p.m., followed by a celebratory dinner and awards presentations.

It all adds up to three days that many attendees-artists, museum staffers, collectors, and the general public alike- find profound. …

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