School Libraries in New Zealand as Technology Hubs: Enablers and Barriers to School Librarians Becoming Technology Leaders

By Calvert, Philip | School Libraries Worldwide, July 2016 | Go to article overview

School Libraries in New Zealand as Technology Hubs: Enablers and Barriers to School Librarians Becoming Technology Leaders


Calvert, Philip, School Libraries Worldwide


Introduction

The rollout of broadband in New Zealand was facilitated in large part by the government's UltraFast Broadband Initiative (UFBI), a public-private partnership to create a fibre optic network delivering download speeds of up to 100Mbps (megabits per second), and in some areas up to 1000Mbps (New Zealand. Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, 2015). Schools were given a high priority in the UFBI, but because fast cables to the front gate are useless unless there is a way of bringing that capacity into the school itself, the government's Schools Network Upgrade Project (SNUP), gave subsidies to upgrade schools' internal data and cabling infrastructures to enable the use of ultra-fast broadband. By May 2015 the government had spent over NZ$165 through SNUP and over 1,500 schools had received network upgrades (New Zealand, Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, 2015).

The impact of the SNUP and the greater bandwidth available through the UFBI was one of several points discussed in a report on the changing landscape in schools by the 21st Century Learning Reference Group (2014). An underlying belief in this investigation is that the thoughtful application of digital technologies incorporated into teaching activities can improve learning outcomes. The report's recommendations include some relevant to school libraries, including the development of regional networks to build local capability that would 'leverage the knowledge and expertise of many practitioners ... who are leading the way in future-focussed teaching and learning' (recommendation 15). While the emphasis is plainly upon teachers, it allows for other staff, including librarians, to contribute. The report specifically states at one point the government should start "supporting school librarians and teachers in charge of libraries to take a stronger leadership role in using digital technology to target achievement outcomes for at-risk students" (p. 16), though it isn't obvious why this was limited only to at-risk students when all students could benefit.

Review of Literature

Around the world many teenagers carry portable devices with them at all times. In parallel with the spread of devices, the use of social media has boomed. In New Zealand 71% of teenagers say they use Facebook, over 50% use Instagram, 33% say they use Twitter, the same percentage use Google+, and 24% use Vine (Miners, 2015). This high permeation of social media into the everyday lives of teenagers suggests that students must learn how to use technology to find, retrieve, evaluate and ultimately to use information (e.g. Asselin & Dorion, 2008; Burnett, 2014).

The need for schools to teach digital literacy is very clear. There are some indications that classroom use of IT is, at least to some extent, correlated with better academic performance (Jarnieson-Proctor, Watson, Finger, Grimbeek & Burnett, 2007; Spieza, 2010). Students cannot be expected to benefit from new technology in schools if their teachers are not comfortable using it, and the exploratory study of Shear, Koh, Patel, Trinidad, Chen Kee and Png (2014) suggests that teachers' understanding of IT and pedagogy has a considerable influence on students' educational attainment.

The library has potential to be one of the most technology-rich spaces in the school. In the 21st century, authors have made the case for school librarians to take a greater role introducing new technology into schools and then facilitating its effective use for teaching and learning, commonly within an adapted curriculum (e.g. Everhart & Dresang, 2007; Hanson-Baldauf & Hughes-Hassell, 2009). One key point is that librarians can interact with the whole school (Smith, 2010, p. 621). However, some educators have a limited vision of the school library and ignore the leadership role it could play in a transformative pedagogy (Leander, 2007), and this myopia will be a barrier to developing the place of the school library until it has been replaced by a more positive attitude. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

School Libraries in New Zealand as Technology Hubs: Enablers and Barriers to School Librarians Becoming Technology Leaders
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.