The Religious Community and the Communist Regime in the Case of Montenegro, 1945-1955

By Prekic, Adnan | Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies, Summer 2016 | Go to article overview

The Religious Community and the Communist Regime in the Case of Montenegro, 1945-1955


Prekic, Adnan, Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies


The aim of the research is to present the position of religious communities in Montenegro, as well as to identify the mechanisms on the basis of which the Communist Party has tried to marginalise religion. Religious communities before the Second World War had a strong influence and were deeply rooted in the social life of Montenegro. The Communist Party after 1945 tried to change that and to eradicate the influence of religion in society. The paper analyses the relation of the Communist authorities towards the Orthodox Church, the Islamic community and the Catholic Church. It also explains the methods and mechanisms with the help of which the Communist Party has marginalised and excluded religious communities from social life, using a concrete set of actions and attitudes towards major religious representatives. The paper analyses the approach of the Communist Party to each of the three religious communities, since there was no uniform ideological and institutional approach towards the three religious communities in Montenegro. In addition to the analysis of the situation in Montenegro, the paper compares the attitude of the state towards religion in Yugoslavia and other Eastern European countries. The period within which the Party's attitude towards religion was viewed has been rounded with the first decade of the Communist government in Montenegro. This is the period in which the process of excluding religious communities from all major social processes was concluded, and in Montenegro it was determined by the organising of the most important party congresses. The research is based on the archival material of the State Archives of Montenegro, i.e. the fund of the Communist Party of Montenegro. Archival material from this fund provides a clear insight into the attitude of the Party and the state towards religious communities. Through the archival material, we could also trace all the mechanisms with which the Communist Party tried to restrict the activities of religious communities. The paper also used daily and periodic press from that period, through which we could keep track of all the ideological messages of the Party regarding religion, as well as the very attitude of the state towards religious traditions. In addition to this, the research uses relevant literature to explain the broader processes and comparison of the situation in Montenegro with other regions.

By taking over power, the Communist Parties in the countries of Eastern Europe initiated major changes that affected all aspects of social life. Under the influence of the communist ideology, traditional values of these countries were undermined, and a new system of values was introduced, based on the teachings of Marxism and Leninism. Religion in most countries of Eastern Europe was the "guardian of the national Christian tradition." Through such a position, religion had a monopoly over values fostered by the society. By taking over power, the Communist Party then generated a conflict between these two concepts. The communists wanted a monopoly over all aspects of social life, which is why immediately after the takeover of power in whole Eastern Europe they began the process of excluding religious communities from social life.1 The conflict between the Communist Party and religion was very traumatic, because religion has had its deep roots in the tradition of all the countries of Eastern Europe.2 Here, after the end of the Second World War and after the Communist Party established its power, a conflict erupted between the new government with religious communities. The source of tension between the two sides stemmed from the different historical and cultural positions of religious communities in these countries and the new Marxist-Leninist view of the world. While in previous social systems, the religious community was one of the basic pillars of the system of government, in the new circumstances religion tried to be discredited, thus destroying all organised forms of religious life. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Religious Community and the Communist Regime in the Case of Montenegro, 1945-1955
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.