HACU Honors EXCELLENCE IN HIGHER EDUCATION

The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education, September 2016 | Go to article overview

HACU Honors EXCELLENCE IN HIGHER EDUCATION


Story courtesy of Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities

The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) established the HACU Hall of Champions to honor those who embody the mission of the Association through exemplary efforts "To Champion Hispanic Success in Higher Education." They began this practice in 2011 with the induction of Antonio Rigual and have continued every year including in 2015 with the induction of Cruz Reynoso. Here are the honorées of HACU's Hall of Champions.

ANTONIO RIGUAL

Throughout his higher education career, the late Dr. Antonio Rigual demonstrated a great commitment to championing Hispanic higher education success as a professor of Spanish, a university administrator and a pioneer of Hispanic higher education on a national level.

Born in Cuba and transplanted to the U.S. at age 15, Rigual started teaching in 1971 at Our Lady of the Lake University (OLLU) after earning a Ph.D. in Foreign Languages at Louisiana State University. Besides serving as Professor of Spanish, he served in various senior administrative roles, including provost, vice president for institutional advancement and vice president for university relations and also served on numerous university councils/committees.

Rigual's passion for education and his great vision opened the path to educational opportunities for many students. He served on numerous national and San Antonio commissions and received a variety of awards including being named OLLU's first Moody Professor (1971), the Fleming Award for Exemplary Faculty Service at OLLU (2000) and San Antonio's Ford Salute to Education Award (Education Category) in 2006. He was a member of the American Association of University Professors.

He passed away December 9, 2014.

TOMÁS A. ARCINIEGA

As a member of the HACU Governing Board from 1994 to 2000 and again from 2003 to 2011 and past Governing Board Chair (1996-97), Tomás A. Arciniega helped build HACU's membership to more than 400 colleges and universities serving the largest concentrations of Hispanic higher education students in 26 states and Puerto Rico. His public championship of the country's fastest-growing school-age population helped HACU win millions of dollars in support from the federal government and the private sector for Hispanic college students and the higher education institutions that serve them.

He served as provost at California State University, Fresno from 1980 to 1983, and in 1983, he was named president of California State University, Bakersfield.

Arciniega was a presidential appointee to the National Council on Education Research; member, Board of Directors, Aspen Institute; member, Air University Board of Directors; member, Board of Trustees, Educational Testing Service; founding member, Board of Trustees, Tomás Rivera Policy Institute, Claremont Colleges; member, Board of Directors, National Hispanic Scholarship Fund; past president, Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC); member, Board of Directors, Mathematics, Engineering and Science Achievement (MESA).

ANNA SOLLEY

Dr. Anna Solley brought 36 years of higher education experience to her role as president of Phoenix College. Solley s extensive career exemplified a lifetime commitment to the community college mission. With accomplishments as an instructional and administrative leader, she has developed expertise in every facet of college leadership. Solley assumed the role of acting president of Phoenix College in January 2005 and was appointed president on April 25, 2006.

Solley has served on the Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education, Arizona Women's Employment and Education Board as secretary, Arizona State University Downtown Business Advisory Council, National Community College Hispanic Council (NCCHC) Board as past president, Raul H. Castro Institute Advisory Committee and St. Joseph's Hospital Community Advisory Board. In addition, she has been a consultant-evaluator and a member of the Institutional Actions Council (IAC) for the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association and has served in the past as the Maricopa Representative to the League for Innovation and as an AACC Board member. …

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