Conflict Communication: Linguoecological Aspect

By Abusyarova, Darya L.; Takhtarova, Svetlana S. | Journal of Organizational Culture, Communications and Conflict, January 1, 2016 | Go to article overview

Conflict Communication: Linguoecological Aspect


Abusyarova, Darya L., Takhtarova, Svetlana S., Journal of Organizational Culture, Communications and Conflict


(ProQuest: ... denotes non-USASCII text omitted.)

INTRODUCTION

The phenomenon of conflict has always occupied a special place in subject sphere of different scientific areas - sociology, psychology, pedagogy, law and linguistics. Currently, axiomatic is the fact that a conflict may arise only in the process of communication. Opposite positions or mental act not being expressed verbally or non-verbally cannot be an indicator of the outbroken conflict, and there is no conflict if only one participant acts. Proneness to conflict in anthropocentric terms is manifested, first of all, in interaction of the subjects of speech production - the author who seeks to unrestricted self-expression, and the addressee who expects a speech production which would be interesting for him in communication (first of all, easy to understand) and comfortable in moral and psychological aspect (Golev N.D., http://lingvo.asu.ru/golev/articles/z09.html, accessed April 2016). Active development of the research concerning the study of personal communicative behavior in the conflict situation has naturally led to the formation of an independent scientific paradigm - linguistic conflictology that considers a conflict as confrontation of two or more communicators involved in a single communicative event that is determined by various factors: psychic, social and ethic, etc., and realized in different discursive practices (Tretyakova V.S., p.301, Gruber H., 1996, p.354). One of the most important tasks of linguistic conflictology is the formation of a negative denotative space of speech communication and factors determining conception, development and solution of the conflict communication. Such problem solving is impossible without defining the nature of a conflict, reasons for its emerging, conflict types, as well as revelation of means and ways used by communicators for ensuring or breaking harmonious communication. The present paper suggests considering these questions from the positions of linguistic conflictology and lingvoecology.

DISCUSSION

Conflict potential of language, depending first of all on the differences in -"pragmatics of the speaker" and "pragmatics of the listener" underlies the emergence of spontaneous and amotivational proneness to conflict, which should be differentiated from the intentional, planned conflicts, in the course of which one of the sides consciously performs the speech acts to the detriment of the other. Such speech acts of the speaker define the speech behavior of the addressee, who, realizing, that the indicated speech actions are directed against his interests, undertakes back such speech actions, expressing his attitude to the subject of the speech or the interlocutor. According to K.F. Sedov, conflict communication is usually based on the desire of one (or both) participants of communication to ease psychological tension for account of the interlocutor. Such relaxation (letting off steam) is preceded by sense of frustration - psychological discomfort, owing to impossibility of achieving a goal (Sedov K. F., 2002).

Thus, the reason for outbreak of a conflict lies in the differences of communicative goals of interlocutors, in reluctance of one or both communicative partners to take into account the interests of the interlocutor in the process of communication, egocentric verbalization of their intentions. The ways to solve the conflict situation may be constructive oriented to such settlement to conflict when communicative image and interests of both interlocutors will be maintained and taken into account, and destructive oriented to the further conflict escalation. In accordance with macrostrategy of communicative behavior in a situation of conflict each of the interactors chooses certain communicative tactics, for example:

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Here are differences in value dominants of the interlocutors, in understanding the acceptable and the non-acceptable in their actions leads to emergence of a conflict in which one of the communicators resorts to the tactics of threat, the other - to offense. …

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