LSCO Piano Concerto Festival

By Davies, Margaret | Musical Opinion, September/October 2003 | Go to article overview

LSCO Piano Concerto Festival


Davies, Margaret, Musical Opinion


LSCO Piano Concerto Festival

The London Soloists Chamber Orchestra, under the baton of David Josefowitz, concluded its Piano Concerto Festival in June with two out of the three concerts devoted exclusively to Mozart. At St Martin-in-the-Fields on 6 June the solo part in Mozart's in C major Piano Concerto K 467 was played by Wu Qian. Not yet out of her teens, this Shanghai-born pianist is the possessor of a sound technique, with which she surmounted the technical hurdles, displaying neat finger work and executing the Cadenza with brio; she also played with great musicality and a mature understanding of the piece. I shall look forward to hearing her again, and to being able to watch her career develop; the lack of a platform in St Martin's means that the view of the soloist is usually obscured by the front rows of the audience. I would also exhort the management there not to admit latecomers in the middle of works; the entrance of individuals in squeaky shoes during the lovely Andante was an insult to the musicians

In the second half, the orchestra was joined in Mozart's Requiem by the Occam Singers. There was a better balance of voices in the Choir than when I last heard them, though they had moments of less than ideal ensemble, but the quartet of young soloists made a strong impression: the soprano Elizabeth Cragg, who soared confidently over the ensemble, the warm-toned mezzo Rachel Lindop, the clear-voiced tenor Adrian Yard and the baritone Jonathan Gunthorpe, who projected his words strongly and provide a rock-steady bass line.

At the Purcell Room on 19 June, two eminent soloists formed the linchpin of an animated and highly satisfying performance of Mozart's E flat Sinfonia Concertante for Violin, Viola and Orchestra. In the many instrumental dialogues, the violinist Gil Sharon and the viola player Rivka Golani gave a demonstration of instinctive musical communication conveying their evident pleasure in performing their unaccompanied duet in the Andante, which was a high point and the orchestra responded vivaciously in their exchanges with the soloists. …

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