Hate Crimes Legislation Vital to Women's Lives

National NOW Times, Summer 1999 | Go to article overview

Hate Crimes Legislation Vital to Women's Lives


Two days after her two-year wedding anniversary, an Arkansas woman was found stabbed approximately 130 times in the breasts, vagina, buttocks, both eyes and forehead. Her husband was charged with the murder.

In Minneapolis, soon after moving to a new apartment, an African-American lesbian found a note reading "Hate Nigger Faggots" at her door. Over the course of several weeks, she and her child endured a host of slurs from neighbors, including: "dyke," "faggot," and "nigger." She and her child moved after a burned cross was left outside their door.

Amy Robinson, a mentally retarded grocery bagger, was abducted by two men in 1998 and used as "target practice" in a field in Fort Worth, Texas. The men shot her with arrows, a pellet gun and, finally, killed her with a pistol. Referring to Robinson's mental retardation, one ofthe men said, "She was suffering anyway. So I guess we just gave her a backdoor."

Across the United States, women are targets of hate crimes every day. Whether you live in Grand Traverse, Michigan or New York City, hate crimes happen. And, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) 1997 Hate Crimes Statistics Report, there were more than 8000 crimes reported which were motivated by bias based on race, religion, sexual orientation, disability, ethnicity or national origin. Since the FBI does not track gender bias motivated attacks, there are no statistics available for those hate crimes that specifically target women.

According to Bonnie Campbell, director of the Office of Violence Against Women at the Justice Department, the largest number of complaints her office receives are from women who find state and local authorities fail or refuse to enforce the law, especially restraining orders. Campbell said her office is also concerned about complaints that law enforcement personnel cover up hate crimes against women, citing cases in which police evidence and reports disappear before the women can bring their claims. Even when local law enforcement is willing, many times they lack adequate resources to investigate and successfully prosecute the criminals.

Hate crimes have a chilling effect on every woman's life. The threat of such crimes instills fear in all women (not just the victims), limiting where we work, live and study. And when we speak out, the violence often increases. Fear severely impacts the number of reported hate crimes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Hate Crimes Legislation Vital to Women's Lives
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.