Rethinking Sexism, Gender, and Sexuality

By Lee, Daemion | Multicultural Education, Spring/Summer 2016 | Go to article overview

Rethinking Sexism, Gender, and Sexuality


Lee, Daemion, Multicultural Education


Rethinking Sexism, Gender, and Sexuality

Edited by Annika Butler-Wall, Kim Cosier, et al.

All grades. www.rethinkingschools.org

Rethinking Sexism, Gender and Sexuality is a not a textbook with academic jargon, but a series of essays by working educators about how they have addressed a range of thorny issues regarding gender and sexuality. What to do when a male teenager wants to wear a dress to school? How to explain gay marriage? What to do about the girl who everyone thinks is a boy? How to teach LGBTQ issues in extremely conservative communities? What are the options for gay and lesbian teachers? This text does not provide any ultimate answers to these questions. Instead, these authors provide inspiration and advice for engaging more confidently and effectively with these issues. Especially as national discussion over gender and sexuality continue-like the current transgender-and-the-bathroom debate-a book like this is more essential than ever. Most of these essays have a very personal tone, as these educators discuss moments in their careers that have been challenging, eye-opening and heart-breaking and hilarious, sometimes all at the same time.

The main chapters of the book include, "Our Classrooms," "Our Curriculum," "When Teachers Come Out," "Beyond the Classroom," and "Teacher Education, Continuing Education." The topics range far and wide, from a preschool teacher recounting her experiences teaching about relationships in "4-Year-Olds Discuss Love and Marriage," to a professor of education discussing how to prepare teachers in "'It's Not Appropriate! …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Rethinking Sexism, Gender, and Sexuality
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.