Peter Maxwell Davies: Job: An Oratorio

By Warnaby, John | Musical Opinion, January 1, 1999 | Go to article overview

Peter Maxwell Davies: Job: An Oratorio


Warnaby, John, Musical Opinion


PETER MAXWELL DAVIES: Job: An Oratorio Valdine Anderson; Linda Maguire; Paul Moore and Kevin McMillan

CBC Vancouver Orchestra; Vancouver Bach Choir;

Conducted by Sie Peter Maxwell Davies

Collins Classics 15162 69'15"

Job is the centre-piece, and most ambitious of three substantial Choral/Orchestral works Maxwell Davies has completed in recent years, following on from The Three Kings and preceeding The Rising. Though Maxwell Davies has contributed to the Unaccompanied Choral repertiore throughout his career these are his first works for Chorus and Orchestra for more than 30 years. As such, they are further examples of the composer revisiting preoccupations of the 1960's from the perspective of the 1990's. They also help to explain his comment that he no longer intends writing opera.

The musical language Maxwell Davies has developed for his Oratorio undoubtedly stems from his earlier choral output, but his experience as a symphonist has enabled him to respond to the dramatic character of the Book of Job without resorting to the paraphernalia of opera. Moreover, as the accompanying notes point out, Job's plight has links with Taverner, The Martyrdom of St Magnus, and even Resurrection.

The 70-minute Oratorio is constructed in three substantial sections, and is symphonic in so far as it is based on material stated in the opening chorus. The emphasis throughout is on Job's words, but other characters are delineated, not only through their association with certain instruments, but equally through the fragmentation of the Orchestra, in which individual instruments are sometimes required to be played in an exaggerated manner. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Peter Maxwell Davies: Job: An Oratorio
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.