Costly Rituals Lead Arunachal Tribes towards Religious Conversion

Hindustan Times (New Delhi, India), November 18, 2016 | Go to article overview

Costly Rituals Lead Arunachal Tribes towards Religious Conversion


Mechukha, Nov. 18 -- An indigenous faith that swears partly by solar energy is fast losing members in Arunachal Pradesh, India's land of the rising sun.

The major beneficiary is Christianity, whose adherents - the 2011 census says - are 30.26% of the frontier state's 1.3 million people, up from 18.7% in 2001. Arunachal Pradesh had no Christians in 1951.

Though there were 5.56% fewer Hindus during this period, the 4.5% drop in the population of followers of indigenous faiths such as Donyi-Polo worries the state's tribes more.

Donyi-Polo means worship of the sun and the moon. The 1981 census said the state had 51.6% followers of Donyi-Polo and other indigenous faiths in Arunachal Pradesh.

The conversion rate picked up in the 1990s. Some of those who converted then say costly rituals involving animal sacrifice made them switch religion. Others attribute conversion to the "healing powers" of the church.

"Our village of 115 people converted 20 years ago because missionaries healed the sick with prayers and medicines and not with mumbo jumbo involving sacrifice of chicken, pigs or mithuns (semi-wild bison). Inability to afford such rituals costing Rs 75,000-150,000 made us become Christians," Tali Yorma, a Pailibo tribal from Lipo village, told Hindustan Times. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Costly Rituals Lead Arunachal Tribes towards Religious Conversion
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.