Transgenderism: A Creature of Political Correctness

By Morabito, Stella | The Human Life Review, Fall 2016 | Go to article overview

Transgenderism: A Creature of Political Correctness


Morabito, Stella, The Human Life Review


Perhaps the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women could more accurately self-identify as the UN Commission on the Abolition of Women. After all, that body's commitment to gender ideology means it is devoted to legally abolishing sex distinctions, female as well as male.

Nevertheless, each year in March, the Commission hosts a glut of events and talks in New York City, presumably to celebrate and support women's rights. This year I had the honor of speaking at a panel there hosted by the pro-life Center for Family and Human Rights (C-Fam). The topic was "Gender Ideology and Political Correctness." My fellow panelists were Michael Walsh, who had just published a brilliant expose of cultural Marxism entitled The Devil's Pleasure Palace,1 and moderator Austin Ruse, who is president of CFam and polemicist extraordinaire.

The experience was both liberating and surreal for me. It was liberating to have the opportunity to talk about something rarely discussed in depth: the inseparable connection between transgenderism and political correctness. And to do so right there in the belly of the UN beast.

And since the UN bureaucracy in New York is perhaps the global bastion of both gender ideology and political correctness, the experience was drenched in surrealism. Consider the fact that transgenderism is an ideology that basically refutes the biological reality of women because its endgame is to abolish all sex distinctions in law. After all, if a man can be a woman, then being a woman to begin with doesn't mean anything. So the UN Commission on the Status of Women is promoting a program that denies the premise of its very existence: women.

Adding to the surrealism was that those who attended in order to protest our talks-basically a gang of young students who swelled attendance to standing room only-ended up proving so many of our panel's points. The connection between these youths' purported agenda to promote "diversity"- in this case, gender ideology/transgenderism-and their caving to the pressures of political correctness could not have been clearer. Their tone of righteous indignation sounded rehearsed, no doubt because such behaviors are so often conditioned in students at today's thoroughly propagandized college campuses and culture. But such performances shouldn't surprise us, because environments hostile to free inquiry are also going to be hostile to clear and independent thought.

Putting on Personas

During the question and answer period, our detractors adopted exactly the personas I would expect well-programmed students to adopt. We had the social justice warrior-a striking young woman with evident but unfulfilled intellectual potential-who loudly complained about white privilege and how she would always face discrimination in her life for the sole reason that her last name is "Lopez." Then there was the soft-spoken young man who wore large dangling earrings to make the point that he was "gender nonconforming." His basic argument went like this: We need a regime of political correctness because otherwise our personal interactions might offend somebody else's reality. Another young agitator simply resorted to labelling us as bigots.

But there were several audience members who were very thankful for our panel. A Maori woman from New Zealand, as well as women from Kenya and Nigeria, expressed gratitude to me for speaking on this topic. They confided that Western elites are applying enormous pressure on their societies to get with the LGBT agenda. (This is a fact that Robert Cardinal Sarah pointed out so persuasively in his book God or Nothing2) They were relieved to hear an affirming voice from Americans at the United Nations.

Indeed, in my talk I focused on that sense of social isolation which is often manufactured through the process of agitation and propaganda (agitprop) that we call political correctness. We should all be alarmed about how deeply propaganda has infected our culture. …

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