Clinical Practice Guide in Psycho-Oncology

By Pop, Florina; Postolica, Roxana et al. | Cognitie, Creier, Comportament, December 2016 | Go to article overview

Clinical Practice Guide in Psycho-Oncology


Pop, Florina, Postolica, Roxana, Lupau, Corina, Dégi, Csaba László, Cognitie, Creier, Comportament


INTRODUCTION

Patient care in the oncological system undergoes a major paradigm shift from disease management to a patient-centered approach, increasingly more attention being paid to psychosocial issues such as cancer distress, quality of life, patients' rights and empowerment, co-morbidities and survival. Negative phenomena in the life of cancer patients amplify each other, generating overlapping effects with a strong psychosocial impact on the quality of life. The World Health Organization defines quality of life as the individuals' perception of their position in life in the context of culture and value systems in which they live and in relation to their goals, expectations, standards and concerns(WHOQOL, 1995). For cancer patients improving quality of life is as important as survival or the prolongation of life. Most psycho-oncology studies view quality of life as an independent prognostic factor of disease progression and survival odds (Di Maio & Perrone, 2003).

Psycho-oncological care is part of an integrative evidence-based approach addressing the psychosocial needs of the cancer patient. "Cancer care for the whole patient" is an interdisciplinary approach including psycho-oncological interventions that is being centered on elements of strict particularity for each single case. Such typology actually gives the measure of therapeutic effectiveness (Bultz & Carlson, 2005)

As part of interdisciplinary medicine, psycho-oncology demands communication and co-operation between medical and non-medical professionals, aiming to derive increased patient satisfaction by promoting patient empowerment and greater participation, responsibility indecision-making regarding the treatment and compliance to the therapeutic program.

There is growing evidence that a multidisciplinary approach improves the level of care provided to the oncology patient, exerting beneficial effects on the professionals of the multidisciplinary team as well. Among the benefits of a multidisciplinary approach to cancer patient care one can mention improvements made by development of a treatment plan in line with the patient's needs and implementation of evidence-based best practices, increased survival rate, better chances to receive care in line with clinical guidelines, including psychosocial support, increased access to information - particularly regarding psychosocial support, increased satisfaction regarding the level of care and, finally, professional development and improved emotional wellbeing on behalf of the professionals involved in the multidisciplinary team (Sainsbury, Haward, Round, Ricler, & Johnston, 1995; Gabel, Hilton, & Nathanson, 1997; Richardson, Thursfield, & Giles, 2000; Changet al., 2001; Hawardet al., 2003).

This guide is addressed to psychosocial specialists working with cancer patients. It aims to provide an easy to use guide in a simply to adopt form for every specialist.

At the moment there are a number of intervention protocols, particularly in the cognitive-behavioral paradigm, but one of the problems encountered in their implementation is due to their format (evaluation and psychological intervention meetings structured over a longer period of time) as such model is not readily appropriate in some medical interventions, more so in an oncological context (considering all the aspects implied by a crisis situation, i.e. preoperative or postoperative psycho-oncological intervention).

In designing and adapting this guide we considered the resources currently available in the Romanian medical system, recommendations of the psychooncology literature - psychosocial care standards recommended by the International Society of Psycho-Oncology (IPOS) in particular -, and our clinical experience in oncology.

We tried to conceive this guide in a manner designed to be useful for specialists with various levels of experience.

The first part of the guide refers to the definition and rationale of psychosocial care in oncology, the second addresses the communication process engaged with the cancer patient, while part three covers screening, psychosocial assessment and practical psycho-oncological interventions during each step of the curative oncological treatment, while part four provides final recommendations on psychosocial care. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Clinical Practice Guide in Psycho-Oncology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.