Next Generation of Cold-Weather Clothing

By Gourley, Scott R. | Army, January 1, 2017 | Go to article overview

Next Generation of Cold-Weather Clothing


Gourley, Scott R., Army


While the U.S. military's strategic pivot toward the Pacific is prompting Army researchers to look at new jungle boots and related clothing technologies, geopolitical activities unfolding in the Arctic regions are contributing, in part, to a similar emphasis on new cold-weather clothing designs.

Over the past decade, options for cold weather generally have focused on the Extended Cold Weather Clothing System Gen III, a seven-layer, 14-component, multilayered insulating system that includes a lightweight undershirt and drawers, midweight shirt and drawers, high-loft fleece jacket, wind jacket, soft-shell jacket and trousers, extreme cold/wetweather jacket and trousers, and extreme cold-weather parka and trousers.

The Gen III system was designed to allow soldiers to adapt to varying mission requirements and environmental conditions. However, the last 10 years have shown the system to be less than a perfect solution. Specific deficiencies include difficulties tailoring the multiple clothing layers with body armor; a lack of flame-resistant properties, with safety implications for mounted operations; a lack of glove options tied directly to the system; and limitations on new technology insertion.

Cold-weather footwear and handwear, while not part of Gen III, have presented some of their own problems ranging from footwear temperature capability gaps to the fact that the majority of cold-weather handwear currently in the system was designed more than three decades ago.

One holistic approach to this situation surfaced during the Army's advanced planning briefing for industry in early August. Focused on the identification and development of nextgeneration cold weather/arctic materials and designs, the briefing reflected ongoing work by the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center (NSRDEC) in collaboration with the U.S. Army product manager for soldier clothing and individual equipment, and the Maneuver Center of Excellence (MCoE) at Fort Benning, Ga.

According to a government announcement, the briefings to industry partners would focus on fiscal 2017-19 efforts to identify and develop novel technologies and ensemble designs in handwear, footwear and clothing to support future programs of record. The announcement said the primary focus would be on improving extreme cold-weather performance of handwear, footwear and clothing to exceed existing requirements.

The announcement also said consideration should be given to novel materials and designs; alternate layering configurations of the base, insulation and outer shell; internal and external moisture management; and integration of flame/no melt/no drip protection. Also, ensembles would need to integrate with body armor and load-bearing equipment, according to the announcement. The inclusion of novel materials and designs that might be emerging in the civilian outdoor clothing arena was fostered by the advanced planning briefing in Salt Lake City that was held in conjunction with the Outdoor Retailer Show.

The Army's primary cold-weather technology activities are covered under an emerging developmental program called the Cold Temperature and Arctic Protection System. CTAPS will protect soldiers against external extreme cold wet/dry environments while regulating internal system comfort and maintaining core body temperature during mission operations.

According to Kate Young, a member of the research, development and engineering center's soldier clothing and configuration management team, the primary concept behind CTAPS is "to inform acquisition requirements for the next clothing system" that will be worn in environments that are extremely cold and also dry or wet. As such, CTAPS will directly support three capability production documents from an emerging environmental protection system capabilities development document now in Army staffing: Cold/Extreme Cold Weather Clothing System; Cold/Extreme Cold Weather Handwear System; and Cold/Extreme Cold Weather Footwear. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Next Generation of Cold-Weather Clothing
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.