Christianity Due for Another Garage Sale

By Longhurst, John | Winnipeg Free Press, January 7, 2017 | Go to article overview

Christianity Due for Another Garage Sale


Longhurst, John, Winnipeg Free Press


"My God, what a sewer-stench is this! Who are you and what do you want?"

With those words, St. Peter greets Pope Julius II when he arrives at the gates of heaven in the 1514 satirical play, Julius Excluded .

In the play, written by the Christian scholar, priest and humanist Desiderius Erasmus, the Pope finds the gates of heaven closed to his entry after he dies.

"What the devil is this?" Julius asks. The doors don't open? Somebody must have changed the lock or broken it."

After being told he brought the wrong key -- the key of power, and not the key of wisdom to open the door to heaven -- Julius loses his temper.

"Now I'm really getting mad," he says. "I'll knock the doors down. Somebody come and open this door right away!"

St. Peter replies by saying "this is a fortress to be captured with good deeds, not ugly words."

Reproved, Julius tries to make a case for entry. He proudly describes how much better the church is because of his work: Regal palaces, crowds of servants, well-trained troops, plenty of gold and so much money "there's not a king in the world who wouldn't appear base and poor."

He also talks about his many political dealings, some of which resulted in wars across Europe.

"Madman!" St. Peter responds. "So far I have heard nothing but the words of a warlord, not a churchman... you boast of having dissolved treaties, stirred up wars, and encouraged the slaughter of men. That is the power of Satan, not a pope. Anyone who becomes the vicar of Christ should try to follow as closely as possible the example provided by Christ."

To which Julius replies: "He may find people to praise his example, but not to follow it, not in these days anyway."

Thoughts about Erasmus and his play came to mind as I thought about how Christians will mark the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation in 2017. Although Martin Luther gets most of the credit for that Reformation, people like Erasmus laid much of the groundwork for the reforms that followed. It has been said "Erasmus laid the egg that Luther hatched."

Like Luther, Erasmus was troubled by the materialism, power and political ambition of the institutional church of his time -- themes he captured in Julius Excluded . …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Christianity Due for Another Garage Sale
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.