Sneer Ing as a Form of Revolution

By Copley, Gregory R. | Defense & Foreign Affairs Strategic Policy, January 1, 2017 | Go to article overview

Sneer Ing as a Form of Revolution


Copley, Gregory R., Defense & Foreign Affairs Strategic Policy


The outgoing US Barack Obama Administration and its supporters embarked on a campaign to traduce and challenge the incoming Administration of Pres. Donald J. Trump in the hope that it would find it difficult to govern effectively.

This may be unprecedented in US history, and could, to the degree that it succeeds, have an impact on US strategic capabilities, actions, and alliances going forward.

No departing US president had gone to such lengths to use the pulpit of the Presidency to discredit an incoming President or presidential candidate as the lengths to which went Obama with Trump. The result was, even by January 2017 - before Mr Trump was sworn into office - to deliberately inflict damage on the strategic credibility and influence of the United States of America going forward.

Pres. Obama continued executive actions after the Presidential elections of November 8, 2016, to create long-term US policy which the Trump Administration would find difficult to reverse, including a last-minute donation of a second tranche of $500-million to the United Nations' Green Climate Fund (diverting funds from the State Dept. budget, avoiding Congressional rejection). Even on the morning of the day Pres. Trump was sworn into office, the White House and State Dept. notified Congress that they had transferred $221-million to the Palestinian Authority in direct defiance of a Congressional order to delay any such funding.

More pernicious attempts to undermine the incoming Administration's agenda were undertaken discreetly, and flew directly in the face of the hypocritical claims by Mr Obama that he was working to ease the transition process for the new Administration. He was, in fact, working in the opposite direction. Most of his actions were done after the electorate had repudiated Pres. Obama's (and his Democratic Party's) policies, putting in place a Republican Administration, a Republican House of Representatives and Senate, and a majority of Republican governorships and state politicians.

Pres. Obama, in the time following the elections, quietly sanctioned a concerted program of civil unrest and disobedience at many levels of US society, particularly within government departments which have been heavily staffed-up by Democrats. The incoming Trump Administration would need to undertake a major program of staff retrenchment within Federal Government departments to avoid the obfuscation and deliberate sabotage being proposed. Pres. Obama also went to considerable lengths to discredit the incoming Administration to the international community.

The fact that this kind of behavior has been deemed acceptable by much of the US media and electorate reflects the great urban-regions divide which characterized the US election voting (a divide which paralleled the United Kingdom's Brexit vote earlier in 2016, and other voting patterns in Europe). What is significant is that most government employees in the US and most modern societies are from that urban voting pool, and therefore identify with the populist parties. [The anti-Trump/anti-Brexit voters were painted by the leftist urban parties as "populist"; in fact, "nationalism" trends were a reaction to the urban populists.]

It is also difficult to determine whether US history can show more extreme examples of divergence between what has been said compared with what has been done than in the Obama Presidency. …

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