Benefits of Inclusive Education for Students with Intellectual Disabled

By Vinodrao, Shinde, V | International Journal of Education and Management Studies, June 1, 2016 | Go to article overview

Benefits of Inclusive Education for Students with Intellectual Disabled


Vinodrao, Shinde, V, International Journal of Education and Management Studies


The concept of inclusive education focuses on each individual child's ability to learn rather than treating all the children the same. Teachers are able to instruct each child in a more individualized way. In the present educational system most of the educated persons are still not aware about the concept of Inclusive education and children with special needs (CWSN). Similarly several things like adaptive teaching techniques, adaptive curriculum, barrier free teaching learning materials etc. Inclusive education is a well-designed platform to achieve the concept of equity and unity. As per the PwD Act 1995, the main aim of Equal Opportunity, Full Participation and Protection of Rights and as per the UN Conventions 2002. Each child must get free and compulsory primary education without any obstacles. As per the present schools environments in India, while talking about inclusion of Students with Intellectual Disabled in regular classroom is a very difficult and challenging task. Most of the Schools are not yet enrolled easily accessible for severely Intellectual disabled and similarly school's head masters and teachers also not willing to enroll these children due to lack of infrastructure, lack of disability knowledge and expertise how to teach them etc. The present schools needs adapt enormous changes for the successful inclusion.

"It is important to support the right of each child to play and learn in an inclusive environment that meets the needs of children with and without disabilities. Each child's culture, language, ethnicity and family structure are to be recognized and valued in the program" (Copple, 2006).

Inclusion in education is an approach to educating students with disabilities. Under the inclusion model, students with disabilities spend most or all of their time with non-disabled students. Inclusive education seeks to completely remove the distinction between special education and regular education and to provide appropriate education for all students, despite their level of disabilities in their local school. It involves a complete restructuring of the educational system so that all schools would have the responsibility of providing the facilities, resources, barrier free environment, adaptive teaching learning material, adapted teaching technic and appropriate curriculum for all students irrespective of disability. It is a philosophical move away from the accommodation of students with special needs into a "normal" system, towards a full inclusion model where everyone is considered normal and where the needs of all can be met. This trend is situated within a broad social justice agenda, which argues that equality for all must include access for all students for to their local school. This trend has been supported by United Nations policies which affirm the rights of children (the United Nations Convention on the rights of the Child, 1989; the United Nations Standard Rules for the equalization of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities (1993; the UNESCO Salamanca Statement, 1994).

If the students with disabilities are educated in the neighborhood school with a special class or schools some distance away, these students become a part of their peer group and local community. Their schools friends are more likely to live in their neighborhood, weekend activities are more likely to occur with people they see every day at school. It helps to develop social relationship.

Inclusive education

Everyone has the right to education- Article 26 Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

No disabled person should be denied the right to participate fully in education alongside others of their age.

Inclusive Education is

* Supporting all people to participate in the cultures, curricula and Communities of their local educational setting.

* Education in regular classrooms, with people of the same age and with the same teacher with flexibility and adaptations to meet the needs of the individual

* Avalué as well as a practice

* Improve education so that all children, youth and adult learners will have equal opportunities to learn and develop in their local, regular educational Schools. …

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