Field Trips: Visual Arts

Teach, November 1, 2016 | Go to article overview

Field Trips: Visual Arts


The Arts provide an avenue for expression, communication, imagination, and individuality. These are all important things to develop for students of all ages. These visual arts-based field trips give students the opportunity to explore their creativity and create their own masterpiece, just in time for the holiday, gift-giving season.

4 Cats

At 4 Cats, there are many art workshops where kids can create something special. They can create their own Van Gogh-inspired painting with acrylic paint on stretched canvas, or an abstract paint-splatter piece in the Paint Splatter Room, inspired by Jackson Pollock. Paint creations aren't the only art form offered at 4 Cats. They also offer Polymer Clay workshops, where students create their own clay creature creations. To find a location near you in Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia, Alberta, Nova Scotia, or Saskatchewan, visit www.4cats.com.

Arts Commons

Arts Commons, located in the heart of Calgary's Cultural District in the downtown core, is one of Canada's largest and most vibrant arts centres. They offer educational programs for teachers and students taught by professional artists and art educators. Recommended for grades K-12, One Day Arts School is a hands-on workshop where students learn through drama, dance, music, art, and multimedia. To learn more, visit www.artscommons.ca.

Audain Art Museum

Located in Whistler, British Columbia, the Audain Art Museum aims to engage students with historical and contemporary art from the province. They offer guided programs in abstracted landscapes, copper, cedar, and wool creations, and costume design, among others. In these programs, students have the opportunity to observe, reflect upon, and discuss the art form, and then express themselves in creating an original piece. For more information, check out www.audainartmuseum.com.

Habourfront Centre

The Harbourfront Centre in Toronto offers a variety of workshops for students of all ages. …

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