Revolution within the Revolution: Women and Gender Politics in Cuba, 1952-1962

By Baden, Denise | The International Journal of Cuban Studies, Winter 2016 | Go to article overview

Revolution within the Revolution: Women and Gender Politics in Cuba, 1952-1962


Baden, Denise, The International Journal of Cuban Studies


Michelle Chase, Revolution within the Revolution: Women and Gender Politics in Cuba, 1952-1962 (Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2015) pb 310pp. ISBN: 978-1469625003

Reviewed by Denise Baden

This book follows the course of the Cuban revolution over 10 years, starting with the growing resistance to the Coup d'Etat of Fulgencio Batista in 1952 and continuing past the revolutionary victory in 1959 and into the first 3 years of Fidel Castro's revolution.

In her account, Michelle Chase talks about women's role in the revolution, in the process enlightening the reader about gender relations in Cuba and also on hitherto unremarked upon forms of revolutionary protest. Chase highlights the differences in how men and women conceptualised their revolutionary roles and their different sites of participation. While the 'official narrative' of the Cuban revolution focuses upon public acts of protest and armed uprisings, Chase shows us the alternative sites and modes of protest occurring in the more female-associated realms of homes and consumption. In the first three chapters, Chase details how great numbers of women participated in the mass movement to oust Batista in the 1950s. Little is said about the female fighting brigade in the Sierra mountains, and instead Chase focuses her attention on how women used their role as mothers to legitimise their complaints against the increasing barbarity of the Batista government.

In later chapters, Chase focuses more on how the revolution affected notions of family, and relationships between family church and state. In chapters 4 and 5, Chase shows that rather than women responding passively to top-down dictates relating to rationing and policing of consumption, women themselves took the initiative to ensure fair distribution of goods in the wake of shortages caused by the US embargo. It was refreshing to see how the leadership was often simply responding to women's own initiatives and demands. In chapter 6, we get a glimpse into the toxic effect of anti-revolutionary rumours spread by the CIA on family life in Cuba that led parents to believe that the Castro government intended to remove their children to Soviet style indoctrination camps. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Revolution within the Revolution: Women and Gender Politics in Cuba, 1952-1962
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.