The Application of Mixed Methods: Using a Crossover Analysis Strategy for Product Development in Real Estate

By Christensen, Pernille H.; Robinson, Spenser et al. | Journal of Real Estate Literature, May 1, 2016 | Go to article overview

The Application of Mixed Methods: Using a Crossover Analysis Strategy for Product Development in Real Estate


Christensen, Pernille H., Robinson, Spenser, Simons, Robert A., Journal of Real Estate Literature


We provide a specific roadmap and process to merge quantitative data with qualitative information to embed professional judgment into the product development process and thereby improve the robustness and fidelity of the final market-driven product. Further, we offer theoretical justification for the application of a mixed methods approach-specifically the combination of quantitative and qualitative data analysis techniques applied in a crossover analysis strategy-when developing market-driven products. Researchers and/or industry professionals working on market-driven products may use this methodology to ensure the robustness and fidelity of their final product.

The development of entrepreneurial market-oriented products like scoring indexes are common ways for researchers to convey simplified meaning from complex systems of information, and make those systems available to market practitioners. The development of these products often solely uses quantitative methods, sometimes adjusted with the ''art'' of professional judgment. An example might include the FICOt score1 used by the majority of consumer lenders in the United States. The Beracha, Hardin, and Johnson Buy vs. Rent Index2 represents another example.

In practice, quantitative data are often used in conjunction with judgment, such as in litigation for determining loss to residential property from environmental contamination. For example, Simons (2006) presents a ''Big Matrix'' that indicates expected losses to real property based on the presence or absence of about 30 variables organized into a five-step model. The underlying regression models are based on a peer-reviewed meta-analysis (Simons and Saginor, 2006), but the application and creation of the matrix table requires professional judgment outside the models.

We propose a new framework for industry product development (PDCV) that builds upon Onwuegbuzie, Collins, and Leech's (2010) instrument development and construct validation (IDPV) process. While the mixed methods approach has seen an uptake in real estate research over the past decade, the use of the crossover analysis technique presented in this paper has not previously been applied to either real estate research or in the development of real estate market products.

In order to help readers less familiar with qualitative and crossover analysis research methods, we use the development of an instrument for scoring green office buildings as a case example to demonstrate the application of the crossover analysis strategy in the proposed product development and construct validation (PDCV) framework. However, it should be noted that the focus of this paper is the introduction of a new methodological approach for the development of more robust and useful market-driven real estate products not the case study itself.

The paper proceeds as follows. In the literature review, we demonstrate the relevance of a mixed methods approach to developing quantitative instruments and discuss the relevance and limitations of the multitrait-multimethod methodology. Onwuegbuzie, Collins, and Leech's (2010) crossover analysis strategy framework for instrument development and its relevance for real estate research are then discussed. Having laid out the conceptual framework, its application using a heuristic example is demonstrated through the development of a Green Building Index. We then discuss the lessons learned and how this framework can be applied broadly in the development of market-oriented products for real estate research, assessment, and evaluation. We close with some suggestions for future research.

LITERATURE REVIEW

Mixed methods have been applied to research for decades (Tashakkori and Teddlie, 1998), despite this, mixed methods research is still considered by some researchers to be a new research paradigm. Although the definition of mixed methods research still remains a contested area, most researchers agree that mixed methods research combines qualitative and quantitative data collection and data analysis within a single study (Teddlie and Tashakkori, 2003; Johnson and Onwuegbuzie, 2004) to better understand research problems by enabling ''breadth and depth of understanding and corroboration'' (Johnson, Onwuegbuzie, and Turner, 2007, p. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Application of Mixed Methods: Using a Crossover Analysis Strategy for Product Development in Real Estate
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.