Impact of Mothers' Literacy on the Morality, Education, Health and Social Development of Their Children

By Mushtaq, Irem; Akhter, Nasreen et al. | The Journal of Educational Research, January 1, 2016 | Go to article overview

Impact of Mothers' Literacy on the Morality, Education, Health and Social Development of Their Children


Mushtaq, Irem, Akhter, Nasreen, Javed, Muhammad, The Journal of Educational Research


Introduction

Children are born idealistic. They absorb the ideas of their parents and imitate their ways of life. They are quick to access values to evaluate character. The child's first school is home from where primary impulses and feelings are learnt. The family members are the first social contacts for the child and mother is the first teacher and caregiver for children. She is primary teacher of skills that their children need to acquire. The interaction between mothers and children is highly educative. She influences their children in wrong or right direction (Blenkin & Kelly, 1988; Grace, Evindar, & Stewart, 2003).

The early days of childhood are very critical. Mothers can strongly influence direct and indirect learning of their children. Mother-child relationship plays an important role in social, psychological and emotional development of a child. The initial experience of child with his mother determines whether he will develop a sense of personal security and of beings loved and accepted (Batool, 2003). The mother is the primary agent in the transmission of the culture of the group to the child, and the socialization of the child.

It is a common view that literate mothers play significant role in the education of their children, because they are actively involved in the education of their children. They can better nourish and care their children with respect to their health and hygiene. They try to flourish learning abilities of children enormously and provide equal opportunities to their daughter for schooling. While illiterate mothers are generally coincides with lower level of children's enrollment, less involve in the education of their children, which can hinder children' education and lower level of children's learning already in schools (Bilal, 2013). Illiterate mothers have more stress in their lives and this stress is a hurdle to interact with all the aspect of their children' education.

Different studies show that mothers' literacy has significant impact on the education of their children. Literate mothers stay more in schools of their children and they are more involved in the education of their children (Benjamin, 1993). Children of literate mothers show great concern in cognitive and language skills of children. Literate mothers have knowledge about child's development and therefore can solve the problems in better way. She knows how to use home as a learning environment for children (Islam & Rao, 2008). Literate mothers can infuse higher moral values in their children. They also influence their child's schooling by being in touch with their teachers (Blenkin & Kelly, 1988). They can discuss educational and extracurricular activities with their school teachers. They can interact with teachers to improve learning of her child at school. The physical and mental health of children is another major concern for mothers (Hildebrand, 1985). Literate mothers are more conscious about the health of their children and can take care of their children in a better way. They know about the health services and can read and understand health related issues.

Pakistan has the lowest literacy rate in the south Asia and the rest of the world. It is one of the five world nations with lowest literacy rate and among the twelve world nations that spend less than 2-2.5 per cent of its gross domestic product on education. According to Pakistan Social and Living Standard Measurement Survey (2013-14) female literacy rate in Pakistan is 47%. Keeping in view this statistics, this study was designed to find out the impact of literate and illiterate mothers on the moral development, education, health and social development of their children.

Significance of the Study

Mothers' literacy has a very important role in the development of their children. This study will help to indicate factors where literate mothers have to pay attention for the better development of their children and highlight the factors where illiterate mothers lack in attending their children regarding the educational progress of their children. …

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