The Power of Culture: Encounters between China and the United States

By Chang, Peter T. C. | International Journal of China Studies, December 1, 2016 | Go to article overview

The Power of Culture: Encounters between China and the United States


Chang, Peter T. C., International Journal of China Studies


Priscilla Roberts (ed.), The Power of Culture: Encounters between China and the United States, Newcastle, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2016, 603 pp.

Sino-US interaction represents one of the most critical international relationships of our times. The former, a rising global power, and the latter, the incumbent superpower, are jostling, subtly at best, for pole position in a still evolving new world order. And we are witnessing the dispatching of both hard and softpower in this geopolitical rebalancing. Like the Americans, the Chinese are dispensing their intangible assets. In addition to political and economic diplomacy, this charm offensive contains a pronounced projection of cultural power, with the aim of procuring international goodwill and strategic advantage.

The Power of Culture: Encounters between China and the United States examines this aspect of the multifaceted Sino-US rivalry. It is a collection of conference articles from the American Studies Network (ASN), a professional entity representing China-based scholars of America studies. As such this book advances a unique point of view, namely, a mainland Chinese perspective of the encounter between these two world powers. Multidisciplinary in scope, it looks at the ongoing engagement from divergent viewpoints, involving fields ranging from political science and international relations, to historical, anthropological and cultural studies.

These divergent essays are organized under three main themes. Part I (Perspectives on Sino-American Relations) is a survey of this important bilateral tie, examine through the lenses of their cultural engagements. It begins with an analysis of the US strategy in East Asia in terms of geopolitics and cultural ambitions. This is followed by a set of articles analyzing the Reagan Administration's policy towards China, American Presidential War Rhetoric, and a taxonomic review of Obama Administration's addresses pertaining to China, among others. The section ends with two studies, one on China's "New Long March" to challenge American cultural primacy and the other the role of US think tank in shaping the American cultural security.

The focus of Part II (Educational Exchanges) is on the interplay of cultural powers within the education arena and looks at it from three angles. The first addresses the American impact on the Chinese world. Set within the backdrop of what he calls a "Cultural Cold War", Zhang Yang elucidated the not widely known American role in the establishment of the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Next we have an analysis of the effects of Chinese Fulbright scholars upon their return to China from the US. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Power of Culture: Encounters between China and the United States
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.