The Impact of Choosing Title Activities as a Post-Reading Task on Learning Reading Comprehension among Pre-Intermediate Language Learners

By Motlagh, Fereshteh Jahan Bozorgi; Gorjian, Bahman | Modern Journal of Language Teaching Methods, December 1, 2016 | Go to article overview

The Impact of Choosing Title Activities as a Post-Reading Task on Learning Reading Comprehension among Pre-Intermediate Language Learners


Motlagh, Fereshteh Jahan Bozorgi, Gorjian, Bahman, Modern Journal of Language Teaching Methods


2Department of ELT, Ahvaz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Ahvaz, Iran.

1.Introduction

In order for language learners to function in a foreign language, they need to be able to speak, listen, write and read that language. In academic settings, reading is assumed to be the central means for learning new information (Celce-Murcia, 2001).

Reading as a skill has received a lot of attention almost in every pedagogical situation because the purposes of reading and the tasks it fulfills can be various and it can affect the learning of other components as well. Richards and Renandya (2002) stated that there are some reasons that reading receives a unique attention among second or foreign language learners. At first, the learners want to be able to read for gaining important information about their careers or their majors. Second, they are able to enhance the process of language learning via written texts which follow various pedagogical goals. "The reading goal is to read for meaning or to recreate the writers meaning. Reading to improve pronunciation practice, practice grammatical forms, and study vocabulary does not constitute reading at all because, by definition, reading involves comprehension. When readers do not comprehend, they do not reading" (Chastain, 1988, p. 217).

Reading comprehension is thus an interactive process between the reader and the text. In that the reader is required to fit the clues providing in the text to his or her own background knowledge. Reading for comprehension is the primary purpose of reading skill. Thus raising students' awareness of main ideas in a text and exploring the organization of a text are essential for good comprehension. As a consequence, the use of graphic representation to highlight text organization and to indicate the ordering of the content information is an important resource for comprehension instruction (Nunan, 2006). Celce-Murcia's (2001) framework of reading instruction consists of: pre-reading instruction, during-reading instruction, and post-reading instruction.

Post-reading instruction focuses on the development of opinions on the texts to discuss the major ideas to be understood by the learners. Demand a critical stance on text information, or oblige students to connect text information to personal experiences and opinions. All three components of the frame work may be integrated into a single lesson with a short reading passage on a familiar topic or they may run across numerous lessons. Reading is a complex skill and we want to see whether choosing title activities as a post-reading task is effective in reading comprehension or not (Celce-Murcia, 2001). To achieve the purpose of reading comprehension, an appropriate approach or methodology is required. Language teaching methodologies involve some of the more popular second language teaching methods of the last half century (Richards & Rodgers, 2001).

Alongside content-based instruction (CBI), task-based language teaching (TBLT) has gained a considerable degree of attention around the world. In TBLT, the learners are given an opportunity to explore the language (Skehan, 1998). Successful teachers have always helped their students to create a connection between the new information they obtain with their real lives. Post-reading activities and tasks are used to help ESL students to think about and respond to texts they have read (Morris & Stewart-Dore, 1990). They support students to consider what they have read and learned that they might use for other language and literacy related activities such as presentations or reading texts.

According to Richards and Renandya (2002), it is important to note that not all but the majority of the writers agree that post-reading tasks should be included in the extensive reading programs. Although the post-reading tasks take time away from reading and may prevent the students' enjoyment from reading, but it should be seen as its own reward in extensive reading. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Impact of Choosing Title Activities as a Post-Reading Task on Learning Reading Comprehension among Pre-Intermediate Language Learners
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.