Personal Information Sharing Behavior of University Students Via Online Social Networks

By Rafique, Ghulam Murtaza | Library Philosophy and Practice, February 2017 | Go to article overview

Personal Information Sharing Behavior of University Students Via Online Social Networks


Rafique, Ghulam Murtaza, Library Philosophy and Practice


Introduction

The use of Social Networking Sites (SNSs) among students and adolescents has been increasing day-by-day to meet, interact and keep in touch with one another. SNSs permit their users to create their personal profiles, in which they reveal a lot of their personal information i.e. real name or a pseudonym, photographs, birthday, hometown, religion, ethnicity, and personal interests (Dwyer, Hiltz, & Passerini, 2007; Tuunainen, Pitkänen, & Hovi, 2009). This information may be used for nefarious purposes by third parties and unsavory individuals which causes many privacy issues. However, little research has been conducted to determine the behavior of sharing personal information by university students via SNSs and Internet. Previous studies only focus on the students under 18 (teenagers) and does not fully understand how students share their personal identifiable information (PII) in online SNSs (Flinn, 2009a; Hinduja & Patchin, 2008; Lenhart, 2007). Therefore, it is needed to determine the personal information sharing behavior of university students via SNSs and Internet by identifying the types of personally identifiable information shared and the traits of students who share personally identifiable information.

The continuously increasing popularity of the World Wide Web (www) caused the rising number of types of services which are available through computer networks. People who use these services, created a new kind of virtual societies usually called online social networks, (Cheung, Chiu, & Lee, 2011; Howard, 2008; Krishnamurthy & Wills, 2009; Leskovec, Backstrom, Kumar, & Tomkins, 2008). They can also be named as web-based social networks (Golbeck & Hendler, 2006), computer-supported social networks (Wellman et al., 1996) or virtual communities (Castells, 2001). Online Social Network Sites (SNSs) are "web sites that allow individuals to (1) construct a public or semi-public profile within a bounded system, (2) articulate a list of other users with whom they share a connection, and (3) view and traverse their list of connections and those made by others within the system. The nature and nomenclature of these connections may vary from site to site" (Boyd & Ellison, 2007, p. 211).

Users of SNSs share a plenty of their Personally Identifiable Information (PII) on online SNSs, either consciously or un-consciously (Hinduja & Patchin, 2008). PII is:

Any information about an individual maintained by an agency, including (1) any information that can be used to distinguish or trace an individual^ identity, such as name, social security number, date and place of birth, mother's maiden name, or biometric records; and (2) any other information that is linked or linkable to an individual, such as medical, educational, financial, and employment information (Koontz, 2008, p. 28).

There are extensive literature discussing the history, developments and the use of online Social Networking Sites (SNSs) by students and adolescents. SNS applications are growing; campus administrators are exploring ways to use SNSs; and faculty is experimenting with SNS tools to support learning. At the same time, students continue to seamlessly adopt and adapt these services in their lives. It is essential that higher education understand SNS practices of students because these sites are fundamentally changing the social fabric of the university (Ellison, 2008). However, there is a dearth of literature describing the students' current practices to share their personal information via SNSs and Internet.

Many studies exist about information and knowledge sharing behaviors and practices of students; however, few focus on personal information sharing behavior of university students. Therefore, the undertaken study describes the current practices and behavior of university students to share their personal information through SNSs. Despite an increase interest in SNSs and their usage, it is surprising that little empirical researches had actually been conducted to determine the personal information sharing practices of university students through SNSs, especially from the perspective of Pakistani origin. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Personal Information Sharing Behavior of University Students Via Online Social Networks
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.