NASP's Strategic Partnership with the Joint Committee on Standards in Educational Evaluation

By Morrison, Julie Q. | National Association of School Psychologists. Communique, March/April 2017 | Go to article overview

NASP's Strategic Partnership with the Joint Committee on Standards in Educational Evaluation


Morrison, Julie Q., National Association of School Psychologists. Communique


The development and dissemination of standards is core to the mission of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP). Indeed, a recent search for the term "standards" on NASP's website yielded 2,910 records. Although most school psychologists think of standards as they pertain to graduate preparation, credentialing, professional ethics, or school psychological services, there is another set of standards in which NASP has a stake. NASP is one of 14 sponsoring organizations of the Joint Committee on Standards in Educational Evaluation. As such, NASP has a seat at the table alongside other prominent organizations, such as the American Psychological Association, the American Educational Research Association, the American Evaluation Association, and the National Council on Measurement in Education. Yet few NASP members have even heard of the Joint Committee.

The Joint Committee was creThe Student Evaluation Standards. Efforts are currently underway to revise The Personnel Evaluation Standards, now in its second edition. All three sets of standards were created using a process specified by federal law in the Title I-Standards Development Organization Advancement Act of 2004. The standard statements for all three sets of standards were approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Standards approved by ANSI become American National Standards. The Program Evaluation Standards are particularly relevant to school psychologists as the NASP Model for Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services identifies "Research and Program Evaluation" as one of three foundations of service delivery alongside "Diversity in Development and Learning" and "Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice" (NASP, 2010). School psychologists are advised to apply The Program Evaluation Standards when evaluating programs designed to meet students' academic or behavioral needs at a school or district level. …

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