Walking Tour Spotlights UH Architecture, History

By Tsutsumi, Cheryl Chee | Honolulu Star - Advertiser, April 2, 2017 | Go to article overview

Walking Tour Spotlights UH Architecture, History


Tsutsumi, Cheryl Chee, Honolulu Star - Advertiser


A two-hour walking tour will cover a mile and more than a century of the University of Hawaii at Manoa's fascinating history. Offered by the American Institute of Architects Honolulu as part of its Architecture Month observance throughout April, the tour will spotlight notable structures and spaces on the university's flagship campus, which is marking its 110th anniversary this year.

VISIT: AIA WALKING TOUR

>> Place: UH Manoa, 2500 Campus Road. Meeting place will be provided when registering.

>> Day: Saturday

>> Time: Tour start times can be reserved between 8 and 10:30 a.m. on a first-come, first-served basis with prepayment.

>> Cost: $15 per person (no refunds will be given but tickets are transferable)

>> Phone: 628-7243. Email: contact@aiahonolulu.org. Website: aiahonolulu.org

>> Notes: Other tour stops are Hemenway Hall, Sinclair Library, Andrews Outdoor Theatre, Campus Center/Warrior Recreation Center, Art Building and McCarthy Mall. Participants should be able to walk a little more than a mile without difficulty. Bring water and snacks and wear comfortable shoes, sunscreen and a hat. Architecture Month events in Honolulu also include open houses at several downtown architecture firms Friday, architectural photography courses on Saturday and April 15, and a film inspired by the theme Our Urban Fabric on April 20.

"Participants will see buildings in a variety of styles," said Purnima McCutcheon, project architect at Group 70 Design and co-chairwoman of the tour committee. "Given time and distance limitations, we will see as many architectural gems on campus as possible."

Here are highlights.

Hawaii Hall

Built: 1912

Design architect: Clinton Ripley; preliminary drawings were created in 1909 by John Mason Young, a professor of engineering

Style: Neoclassical

McCutcheon: "The Neoclassical style was popular in America from the mid-19th century to early 20th century. The buildings in this style are simple, elegant, rule-bound, symmetrical and typically massive and awe-inspiring, often with free-standing columns. Neoclassical is essentially the revival of classical Greek and Roman architecture and first emerged as a reaction to the excessive ornamentation of the Baroque and Rococo styles that preceded it."

Significance: Hawaii Hall was the first permanent building on campus and the first building in the Quadrangle (now known simply as the Quad), which includes five other Neoclassical buildings constructed between 1922 and 1995. Originally the hub of campus activities, Hawaii Hall housed classrooms, administrative offices, the library, an art studio, an animal husbandry laboratory and an athletic locker room.

Bachman Hall

Built: 1949

Design architect: Vladimir Ossipoff

Style: Hawaiian Modern

McCutcheon: "This unpretentious two-story building is almost 70 years old, yet it still feels fresh and relevant today. It addresses functional needs while harvesting breezes, offering protection from the sun and rain, and honoring the cultural context; for example, there's a stone ahu, or Hawaiian shrine, in the center of the courtyard. I love the sophisticated anthropometric sensitivity that Ossipoff displays in breaking up the courtyard from larger to smaller spaces and providing access to it through ground-floor walkways and two-story loggias. This prompts visitors to slow down and take a few minutes for introspection and to experience the spirituality of the place. …

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