The Development of a Talent Management Framework for the Private Sector

By van Zyl, Ebben S.; Mathafena, Rose B. et al. | SA Journal of Human Resource Management, January 1, 2017 | Go to article overview

The Development of a Talent Management Framework for the Private Sector


van Zyl, Ebben S., Mathafena, Rose B., Ras, Joyce, SA Journal of Human Resource Management


Introduction

Key focus of the study

This study focuses on the development of a talent management framework for the private sector. There seems to be a lack of a uniform theoretical talent management framework in the private sector, which can be used as a guideline to drive talent management.

Background

Collings and Mellahi (2009) asserted that since a group of McKinsey consultants coined the phrase 'war for talent' in 1997, the topic of talent management has received a remarkable degree of practitioner and academic interest. This relatively recent emphasis on talent management represents a paradigm shift from more traditional human resource to strategic talent management, which according to Silzer and Dowell (2009) is driven by corporate strategy, incorporated with other processes, managed as a core business practice and deep-seated as a talent mindset. The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (2006) further views excellent and best practice level of talent management as a strategy designed to deliver corporate and human resource management strategies. Often there is a formal talent management initiative linked to the human resources management function and flowing vertically from the corporate strategy-making process.

According to Powell and Lubitsh (2007), talent management has moved rapidly up the corporate agenda in recent years, and this is evident in the amount of research papers published over the last decade (e.g. Ashton & Morton, 2005; Bersin, 2006; Chikumbi, 2011; Church, Rotolo, Ginther & Levine, 2015; Collings, 2014; Festing & Shafer, 2014; Nijs, Gallardo-Gallardo, Dries & Sels, 2014; Meyer, 2005; Odierno, 2015; Prinsloo, 2012). Egerova (2014) is of the opinion that the increasing attention to talent is affected by factors including globalisation, knowledge-based competition, changing the world of work as well as new forms of organisations and demographic changes.

Despite the growing popularity of talent management and over a decade of debate and hype, the concept of talent management remains unclear (Collings & Mellahi, 2009; Festing & Schafer, 2014; Nijs et al. 2014). Furthermore, the current state of talent management literature is exacerbated by the fact that in addition to ambiguities around the definition of the concept, there is also alarmingly limited theoretical development in the area as highlighted in the research conducted by Arris, Cascio and Paauwe (2013). Consequently, even though business and consulting firms in the private sector have been driving talent management as a strategic priority, there seems to be an overall lack of theoretical frameworks in the academic field.

Overall, there also seems to be a lack of linkage between talent management practices and the broader human resource systems (Ntonga, 2007), as well as an absence of clear succession planning, skills audits and organisational culture driving talent management (Chikumbi, 2011).

This study attempted to bring to light critical factors which must be taken into account to ensure that organisations can achieve successful implementation of an integrated, holistic and comprehensive talent management framework. The framework will strive to guide talent management practices within companies in the private sector, and also improve and advance the maturity of talent management application.

Purpose

The primary aim of the study was to develop a talent management framework for the private sector. The secondary aim of this study was to conduct a modernist qualitative research study in order to explore and gain in-depth knowledge on talent management and what it entails.

More specifically, the study aimed to:

* bring to light the understanding of the concept of talent management through moving towards a clear language of defining talent management as well as the content thereof

* apply qualitative research and the use of analytic induction as an overall data analysis strategy, while using constructionist grounded theory to operationalise the data analysis, thus elucidating how these approaches can be used in talent management studies

* inform human resource practitioners and business managers on how to plan, implement and evaluate talent management in their business in the most comprehensive, systematic, integrated, strategically driven and flexible manner while realising the benefits for the business. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Development of a Talent Management Framework for the Private Sector
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.