Summary of Results and Conclusions: Regional Master Cascade of Social Complexity in Italy, Spain and Mexico

By Figueredo, Aurelio José; de Baca, Tomás Cabeza et al. | Mankind Quarterly, Spring 2017 | Go to article overview

Summary of Results and Conclusions: Regional Master Cascade of Social Complexity in Italy, Spain and Mexico


Figueredo, Aurelio José, de Baca, Tomás Cabeza, Peñaherrera-Aguirre, Mateo, Mankind Quarterly


The series of linked articles encompassed within this special issue focused on using bioecological and psychosocial indicators to predict population-level societal outcomes. Our approach is consistent with many theoretical models that posit that multiple levels of environmental organization have mutual transactional and systemic impacts on each other (Bronfenbrenner & Morris, 2006). Like these systems models, evolutionary ecological theories of life history strategy affirm that ecological constraints shape groups and individuals both phylogenetically and developmentally, via different but interacting selection pressures (Ellis et al., 2009). Thus, our attempt in these articles was to integrate existing theories, through successive hierarchically nested levels of biological, psychological, and social organization, within a life history theoretical framework to spur future research designed to better test these models. Prior to discussing general implications and future directions for this area of research, we provide a brief summary of the results and conclusions of each of the articles.

Article 1. Figueredo, Fernandes & Woodley of Menie (this issue) set the stage for the entire enterprise by describing the multidisciplinary effort in terms of an emergentist philosophical framework, in which sciences aimed at studying living systems at hierarchically increasing levels of complexity can build on each other to achieve true consilience among the different fields, noting that this is different from subsuming each system into others as when using a reductionist approach. Afterwards, they review the foundational theoretical work of Hutchinson in creating a formal mathematical structure for quantitative theoretical ecology, in which formerly qualitative concepts such as the ecological niche could be more precisely defined and measured, also recounting some of the historical background and controversies surrounding those ideas. They then review the more recent literature applying and extending these ideas to the evolutionary dynamics of behavioral diversification in personality and life history traits. Finally, based on these points, they introduce the theoretical and quantitative analytical frameworks undergirding the remaining articles in the Special Issue, by reviewing the mechanics and the rationales behind the sequential canonical cascade model and the continuous parameter estimation model that are used throughout the entire series of linked articles.

Article 2. Cabeza de Baca & Figueredo (this issue) examine the impact of climate and ecology on population density and life history strategy from population-level data in Mexico, Spain and Italy. While population density was not significantly predicted by climatic and ecological factors, ecological factors that describe seasonally cold weather (higher latitude or altitude, lower average temperature) significantly predicted the evolution and development of slower life history strategies. Increased population density was also a significant predictor of slower life history strategies, although the effect was only moderate in magnitude.

Cabeza de Baca & Figueredo (this issue) also derived implications of these results for the examination of human life history strategies in any future research. It is already known that traditional hunter-gather societies that have stable and predictable ecologies, characterized by stable group membership, exhibit more cooperation than groups with transient group compositions (Smith et al., 2016). Thus, where there is an increase in the stability of group membership, withingroup cooperation among individuals also increases (Flinn, Geary & Ward, 2005). The demands of food extraction in colder, harsher environments and those of manipulating and navigating social environments would have created selective pressures on brain development (see Article 5; Alexander, 1974; Flinn, 2006), and not only on life history traits and behavior. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Summary of Results and Conclusions: Regional Master Cascade of Social Complexity in Italy, Spain and Mexico
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.